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Archive for July, 2018

Itchy issues – Storm’s story

Storm is a beautiful 13 year old tabby cat. Sometime ago, she started getting really itchy! She had lots of investigations to look for different parasites and infections. Storm was developing bald patches, scabs and sores which were becoming uncomfortable for her. Despite the investigations, there was no underlying cause found to determine why she was so itchy.

Storm was referred to our dermatologist (skin specialist), David Godfrey, for intradermal skin testing. This involves injecting small amounts different potential allergens and measuring the reaction to these allergens. It was found that Storm is allergic to dust mites, fleas, grass tree and weed pollens!

Storm was started on injections which contain small amount of allergens she is allergic to in the aim that over time desensitisation will occur. Storm has had a fantastic response to her treatment and is much happier and comfortable, however on some occasions the response to her injections differs.

Storm regularly visits our cat clinic for her monthly injections and is very well behaved!
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Blue-green algae – Ashland Lake

Following water safety checks at Ashland Lake this week (week commencing 23rd July 2018), a potentially toxic bloom of blue-green algae has been reported to the Environment Agency.

As a precautionary measure, notices are being posted at the lake warning that contact with the algal scum should be avoided.

What are blue-green algae?
Blue-green algae naturally occur in inland waters and blooms can form when their numbers become excessive. It is these ‘blooms’ that give the water a blue-green appearance or a ‘pea soup’ like colour. The behaviour of these algae is erratic and the level of its toxicity can fluctuate; it can appear one day, be dispersed by the wind and, mix and re-accumulate at any time.

How can blue-green algae affect you and your animals?
Blue-green algal blooms can produce toxins hazardous to both people and animals. Not all blue-green blooms produce toxins, but it is not possible to tell which are dangerous without testing, and therefore all blooms should be considered potentially toxic. Dogs that enjoy swimming and playing in lakes and ponds may be exposed to blue-green algae.

Symptoms of poisoning include:
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Blood in stool or black, tarry stool
  • Pale mucous membranes
  • Jaundice
  • Seizures
  • Disorientation
  • Coma
  • Shock
  • Excessive secretions (e.g., salivation, lacrimation, etc.)
  • Neurologic signs (including muscle tremors, muscle rigidity, paralysis, etc.)
  • Blue discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes
  • Difficulty breathing
Aggressive, immediate treatment is necessary to help treat this quick-acting, potentially fatal poison. If there are any signs of illness in your animal after contact with the water, contact us immediately on 01908 397777.
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Congratulations Caroline!

MK Vet Group would like to congratulate our Cat Clinic nurse Caroline on passing her International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) Diploma in Feline Nursing with a Distinction earlier this year! We are all extremely proud of her and her effort that she has dedicated to the course.

The Feline Nursing course provides nurses with the skills to improve the welfare and understanding of cats in their care.
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Top tips for the warmer weather!

In this current warmer weather, our pets aren’t able to cope as well. Therefore as owners, we need to make sure they are safe, cool, healthy and happy.
  • HOT CARS
  • This is one of the biggest health concerns during the warmer months. Animals should never be left in a locked car when it’s hot outside. Even if the window is open, temperatures can increase to extreme levels very quickly. As a result, pets suffer from heatstroke.
  • PROTECTING YOUR PET’S SKIN
  • Animals can get sunburnt too just like us! If they will be exposed to the sunlight, apply sun cream to white and pink areas of their skin and importantly the tip of the ears. Animals with lighter coloured fur will be more prone.
  • FROZEN TREATS
  • Animals will love to have something cool, so why not pop your dog’s Kong in the freezer for a nice cool and refreshing treat. You can also use frozen water bottles wrapped in a towel and pop it in their bed for our cats and small furries

  • FLYSTRIKE
  • Our smaller pets such as rabbits and guinea pigs can be more at risk more quickly in the hotter temperatures. To reduce the chance of flystrike, check around their bottoms for fly eggs or maggots. This should be checked at least once a day. There are preventative treatments for Flystrike which last around 6 weeks depending on the product.
  • HAIRCUTS
  • Those pets with thick fur coats, why not book them in with the groomer to help them feel cooler during the warmer weather.
  • WALKING YOUR PETS
  • We advise to walk your dog during the cooler times of the day such as early morning or late evening. If it is still too hot to walk them, give them a rest of the evening. It is safer for them to not have a walk than to be at risk of heatstroke
  • WATCH OUT FOR GRASS SEEDS
  • After walking your dog, it is a good idea to check their feet for any grass seeds. If these are left, they can track under the dog’s skin and cause swelling and lameness. They can also be found in dog’s ears!
  • HEATSTROKE
  • Signs to look out for include collapse, rapid panting, excessive drooling and sticky gums. Provide your pet with plenty of fresh, clean drinking water and provide a shaded area. If you are worried that you pet is suffering from heatstroke, please seek veterinary advice immediately.
  • PROVIDING COOL AREAS
  • Prevent your pet from sitting in direct sunlight, provide a shaded area and move hutches and cages if necessary.
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