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Top tips for the warmer weather!

In this current warmer weather, our pets aren’t able to cope as well. Therefore as owners, we need to make sure they are safe, cool, healthy and happy.
  • HOT CARS
  • This is one of the biggest health concerns during the warmer months. Animals should never be left in a locked car when it’s hot outside. Even if the window is open, temperatures can increase to extreme levels very quickly. As a result, pets suffer from heatstroke.
  • PROTECTING YOUR PET’S SKIN
  • Animals can get sunburnt too just like us! If they will be exposed to the sunlight, apply sun cream to white and pink areas of their skin and importantly the tip of the ears. Animals with lighter coloured fur will be more prone.
  • FROZEN TREATS
  • Animals will love to have something cool, so why not pop your dog’s Kong in the freezer for a nice cool and refreshing treat. You can also use frozen water bottles wrapped in a towel and pop it in their bed for our cats and small furries

  • FLYSTRIKE
  • Our smaller pets such as rabbits and guinea pigs can be more at risk more quickly in the hotter temperatures. To reduce the chance of flystrike, check around their bottoms for fly eggs or maggots. This should be checked at least once a day. There are preventative treatments for Flystrike which last around 6 weeks depending on the product.
  • HAIRCUTS
  • Those pets with thick fur coats, why not book them in with the groomer to help them feel cooler during the warmer weather.
  • WALKING YOUR PETS
  • We advise to walk your dog during the cooler times of the day such as early morning or late evening. If it is still too hot to walk them, give them a rest of the evening. It is safer for them to not have a walk than to be at risk of heatstroke
  • WATCH OUT FOR GRASS SEEDS
  • After walking your dog, it is a good idea to check their feet for any grass seeds. If these are left, they can track under the dog’s skin and cause swelling and lameness. They can also be found in dog’s ears!
  • HEATSTROKE
  • Signs to look out for include collapse, rapid panting, excessive drooling and sticky gums. Provide your pet with plenty of fresh, clean drinking water and provide a shaded area. If you are worried that you pet is suffering from heatstroke, please seek veterinary advice immediately.
  • PROVIDING COOL AREAS
  • Prevent your pet from sitting in direct sunlight, provide a shaded area and move hutches and cages if necessary.
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Cheeky’s Trip to MK Vet Group Cat Clinic

Cheeky visited us at our Stoke Road cat clinic last month as he needed dental treatment. He was lucky enough to be the only cat having a procedure that day so it was nice and quiet and got lots of fuss from our team. Cheeky was provided with a cat castle to provide a place to feel safe and secure and we also use Feliway diffusers which release pheromones to help our patients feel relaxed.

Prior to Cheeky’s anaesthetic, he was given a premedication to provide pain relief prior to his dental and make him relax. Once the premedication had taken effect, he was given an injectable anaesthetic to induce anaesthesia and maintained on anaesthetic gas throughout the dental. Throughout the anaesthetic, Cheeky was monitored by our nurse and connected to monitoring equipment including ECG, capnography and blood pressure monitoring.

Before any extractions, the vet will assess the teeth and take x-rays to assess the roots which are under the gum line. After assessment, Cheeky had to have 8 teeth extracted which were found to be diseased. The x-rays also showed that Cheeky had a condition called pulpitis which was affecting one of his canines. Pulpitis is inflammation of the dental pulp tissue. The pulp contains bloods vessels, nerves and connective tissue, supplying the tooth’s blood and nutrients. Pulpitis is usually a secondary complication of a fractured or chipped tooth.

After Cheeky’s dental, he was placed into a recovery area and monitored by our nurse until he was awake. Cheeky has now recovered well and regained his appetite!

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Slimmer of the Week

This beautiful little girl is Bo, Bo started coming to see Charlotte in our weight clinics over 2 years ago. Her owners have been so dedicated to helping her lose the weight and it has made the biggest difference to her! Before she used to be a very lazy cat, just sleeping all the time (she didn’t even fit through her cat flap!), now she runs around and plays and hops in and out of her cat flap with no issue!

So please join us in sending an absolutely HUGE congratulations to Bo and her owners for this incredible life changing weight loss! Charlotte is so proud of what they have achieved!

If you have any worries that your pet may be a little on the porky side, please don’t hesitate to contact us, we run free weight clinics throughout the week at several of our branches.

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National Pet Month

WHAT IS NATIONAL PET MONTH?

This month is a celebration of our animal friends. National Pet Month is a registered charity with the aim for promoting responsible pet ownership. They also aim to bring together pet lovers from all walks of life.

THE AIMS OF NATIONAL PET MONTH
  • Promote responsible pet ownership
  • Increase the awareness of the roles of pet care specialists
  • Raise the awareness of the benefits of owning a pet
  • Highlight the value of assistance and working companion animals
Find out more about National Pet Month by visiting www.nationalpetmonth.org.uk. As part of National Pet Month, we would like to introduce you to our MKVG pet family.
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Be Aware at Easter

During Easter, there are plenty of treats around the household. Some of those treats are toxic to your pets and we advise to be aware of potential dangers.


EASTER EGGS – Easter eggs contain cocoa solids which contains Theobromine – this is poisonous to animals. All chocolate whether it is white, milk or dark can contain Theobromine. If you pet has eaten some chocolate, please make sure you bring the chocolate wrapper when you visit your vet.

GRAPES – Take care to keep grapes away from your pet. Some individuals may not show immediate signs, poisoning can occur with as little as 8 grapes in a Yorkshire Terrier.

HOT CROSS BUNS – Raisins, currants and sultanas can be poisonous to animals so please take care to keep cakes and buns away from your animal.

MOULD – Innocent looking mould on food in rubbish bins and sacks can contain toxins which will attack an animal’s nervous system. Small amounts of these mycotoxins can cause tremors and seizures.

DAFFODILS – Many bulbs, plants and house plants can be poisonous to dogs. If you are unsure of the name of the plant and don’t have a label, ensure you bring part of the plant to try and identify it.

BONES – Small & cooked bones especially from poultry can fragment into pieces with very sharp edges when chewed by dogs. If swallowed, these can then become stuck in the digestive tract and may require surgery to remove.

ONIONS – All of the onion family including shallots, leeks and chives whether they are dried, cooked or raw can be poisonous to animals. Always check the packaging if your pet has eaten something.
If your pet ingests a toxin, we advise you contact your vet for advice and keep the product packaging to hand if they have any questions.
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