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  • Free kitten treatment
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Pesky Parasites – Ticks

TICKS are commonly found in long grass, and attach themselves to your pet as they brush passed. They are eight legged and are composed of two body sections. Their highly developed mouthparts allow them to pierce a pet’s skin and feed on the animal’s blood, sometimes causing reactions at the site of attachment. Severe infestations can lead to anaemia in young animals. Ticks are associated with Lyme Disease, Babesiosis and Ehrlichiosis.

HOW TO HELP YOUR PET AGAINST TICKS?
Prevent Ticks by using a prescription tick product as directed by the manufacturer or your veterinary surgeon. Products can be in a variety of forms such as collars, tablets or spot on treatments. Protection against Ticks is now included within our Pet Health Plan, find out more here.

If you have any questions about these parasites or prevention, our staff would be happy to help.
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Pesky Parasites – Fleas

FLEAS are a small, wingless insects, just a few millimetres long with hind legs modified for jumping. The majority of the flea life cycle will occur off the animal, but can easily occur in the home. The fleas lay their eggs on the animal, which then fall off into the environment (e.g. onto bedding or carpets). Only 5% of the flea population is actually on the animal, the remaining 95% is in the environment in form of eggs, larvae and pupae.

HOW IS YOUR PET AFFECTED?
Fleas will bite cats, dogs, rabbits and even humans. You may notice your pet is scratching, licking or biting a lot, has unusual red patches of skin, signs of hair loss or flea dirt. Flea dirt looks like tiny black dots and can be identified by a simple quick test:
  • Take a piece of paper towel and dampen
  • Rub gently on your pets fur where you suspect there is flea dirt
  • If the black dots change to a reddish-brown colour – FLEAS ARE PRESENT!
Some animals may suffer from flea allergic dermatitis (FAD), which is irritation of the skin directly related to the presence of fleas, and a strict flea prevention routine should be followed to alleviate the symptoms.

HOW TO HELP YOUR PET AGAINST FLEAS?
Treat your pet with a prescription flea product as directed by the manufacturer or your veterinary surgeon. These can be in a variety of forms, such as spot-ons, collars or tablets. Speak to our staff about our Pet Health Care plans to make sure your pet gets the best prevention at the most affordable prices or find out more here. With a heavy infestation of fleas, don’t forget to treat the environment as well. Remember those fleas can live in bedding, sofas, beds, carpets, car, etc. so it’s just as important to treat the home as it is the pet!
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Cat of the Month – Jasper

Jasper is a handsome 4 year old ginger male cat who was brought into the vets as his owner noticed that he was unsettled and straining to pass urine without passing anything.

On examination the vet found that Jasper’s bladder was very full and painful but he wasn’t able to urinate. Jasper was in a lot of pain and needed to have a sedation to have a catheter passed up into his bladder to drain the urine. This condition is called Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease FLUTD) and can have many different underlying causes. Jasper was diagnosed with Idiopathic FLUTD which means that the exact cause is unknown.

Jasper was kept in the hospital for a few days with a urinary catheter in place to allow us to flush his bladder and monitor his urine output. He was also treated with a combination of medications to keep him comfortable and keep his urine flowing. Some cats will recover well after a few days in hospital but unfortunately Jasper was one of the unlucky ones who was in and out of hospital for a couple of weeks due to recurrent problems of obstruction.

Jasper was then referred to a veterinary medicine specialist for further investigation to give him the best chance of recovery, as he continued to have problems. After carrying out more tests he was put on additional medications. Fortunately for Jasper this was successful and he is doing well on his medication. He comes back for regular visits and has become very popular amongst our nurses.

FLUTD is a difficult condition to treat and manage. It is more common in male cats as they have a long narrow urethra compared to female cats and so are more susceptible to problems and obstruction. Overweight cats and indoor cats are also known to be at higher risk of this condition.

Jasper was very lucky that his owners spotted something was wrong early enough for him to be successfully treated. This is a very painful condition and can be life threatening if not treated immediately.

Please make sure you call your vet as an emergency if you notice any of the following signs –
  • Repeated attempts to urinate that are unproductive
  • Crying or discomfort when straining to urinate
  • Increased agitation, possible vomiting.
There are some things you can do at home to help prevent lower urinarytract disease like Jasper’s, which include
  • Increasing water intake
  • Use multiple litter trays around the home
  • Minimising stress
  • Reducing obesity and encouraging exercise
Please let us know if you would like to discuss any of these recommendations in relation to your cat as we have lots more advice to offer.
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Xylitol toxocity in our pets

Xylitol is a sweetener which can be found in sugar-free products such as some baking mixes, cakes, buns, sugar-free chewing gum and mints, medicines, vitamines, peanut butter, sweets, jam and honey.

Signs of this toxicity may include weakness, lethargy, collapse, vomiting, tremors, jaundice or hypoglycaemia.

If you pet has ingested a food containing Xylitol, please contact your practice immediately for advice.
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MK Love Animals Family Fun Day

Bring your family and friends along on 19 May to meet local animal charities, play games, win prizes, buy items for sale and have a fun day out. There will be a fun dog show, food for sale (inc a vegan BBQ) and lots more. Dogs are welcome too! Free entry and parking.

Run by MK Cat Rescue and sponsored by Milton Keynes Veterinary Group.
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