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Feline Infectious Enteritis

This disease is caused by feline parvovirus otherwise known as Feline Panleukopenia Virus or Feline Infectious Enteritis and is a disease threat to the feline population especially in rescue shelters. In some cases, infection can lead to a potentially fatal outcome.

It is spread by direct contact with infected faeces and indirectly via the environment. Carriers of this disease can continue to excrete the virus for at least six weeks from infection.

Unfortunately there is no cure for this virus and it is highly contagious to other individuals. Vaccination is available in order to prevent this disease, this being one of the diseases routinely vaccinated against within the UK.

We feel owners should be aware of this disease as well as the potential symptoms in order to detect the disease at an early time.


Symptoms of this disease may include:
  • Gastrointestinal signs
  • Fever
  • Lack of appetite
  • Depression
  • Anaemia
If you have any further questions regarding this disease, please don’t hesitate to contact the practice on 01908 397777.
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How can I increase my cat’s water intake?

As our cats enter their elderly stages of life, they are at more risk of becoming dehydrated, therefore it is important to adapt your house for their needs.

There are some tips on increasing water intake in our cats:
  • Provide multiple water sources around the home.
  • Providing moving water sources (such as fountains)
  • Provide a variety of different cups and bowls
Cats are able to taste water and usually avoid stagnant water, so always ensure that water is fresh. You could try a variety of different waters including spring water, filtered water and tap water. If your cat is reluctant to drink then extra water can be added to their food to prevent dehydration from occurring.
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Vaccine Amnesty – March 2019

Vaccine Amnesty Month 1st March – 31st March

Are you pet’s vaccinations overdue?

Our Vaccine Amnesty makes it easy to bring your pet’s vaccinations up to date and protect them against preventable diseases. This offer means your pet will receive a full vaccination course for the price of a single vaccination.

During your pet’s consultation one of our veterinary surgeons will give guidance regarding your pet’s vaccinations as well as receiving a full health check and physical examination.

Why not consider joining out Pet Health Care Scheme for a low monthly cost?
Our scheme includes your pet’s routine yearly vaccinations as well as your flea, tick and worming treatment through the year. For more information, click here.

Terms of offer
  • Offer available for dogs and cats who vaccinations have lapsed (cannot include new puppy or kittens courses)
  • Offer is for full vaccination course for the price of one single vaccination
  • Any additional consults will be charged at usual cost
  • Offer is valid from 1st March until 31st March 2019 – initial vaccination must be booked in the time period
  • The offer is valid across all branches – Walnut Tree, Stoke Road, Whaddon Way, Stony Stratford and Willen
  • If you have an outstanding balance with us, we will ask you to settle this before the appointment
  • Non-clients can use this offer if they register with us and agree to our terms and conditions
What diseases can we vaccinate against?

Dogs
  • Canine Parvovirus – This disease is caused by Canine Parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and is spread through the environment or dog to dog contact. This virus is highly contagious in all unvaccinated animals. Symptoms of this disease may include gastrointestinal signs, anaemia, shock and dehydration.
  • Canine Distemper – This disease is caused by Canine Distemper virus, and is spread by direct contact with affected dogs. Symptoms may include nasal discharge, sneezing, difficulty breathing and coughing.
  • Infectious Canine Hepatitis – This disease is caused by the virus Canine Adenovirus Type 1 (CAV-1), and usually spread via contact with in the environment rather than dog to dog contact. Symptoms may include lethargy, high temperature, gastrointestinal signs, jaundice and painful abdomen.
  • Leptospirosis – This disease is caused by the bacteria Leptospira. It can be spread by direct contact with infected urine or contaminated water. Symptoms may include fever, gastrointestinal signs, jaundice, dark urine and dehydration.
Cats
  • Feline Panleukopenia (Feline Infectious Enteritis) – This disease is caused by Parvovirus and is highly contagious. It can be spread easily from cat to cat and excreted in faeces and bodily fluids. Symptoms can include gastrointestinal signs, fever, loss of appetite, depression and anaemia.
  • Cat Flu – Feline Herpesvirus and Feline Calicivirus are the two main causes of ‘cat flu’. It spreads through air droplets caused when infected cats sneeze, or via nasal and ocular discharge. It can also be spread through direct contact with an infected cat or via a person’s clothing. Symptoms may include fever, lack of appetite, lethargy, discharge from eyes and nose, sneezing and mouth ulcers.
  • Feline Leukaemia– This virus is found worldwide, and is spread through mutual grooming and bite wounds as it is contained in body fluids. Symptoms can include fever, lethargy, poor coat condition, weight loss, anaemia and gastrointestinal signs.
Further information can also be found regarding titre testing in dogs here.

Please contact our reception team on 01908 397777 to book your pet’s appointment today!
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Meet Beautiful Bella our Cat of the Month

Bella is a lovely 3yr old female black and white cat who has had a history of vomiting and diarrhoea since she was a kitten.

A lot of animals will come to see us with these symptoms but fortunately it is only a sign of an underlying disease in a small number of them.

Bella had a lot of tests to find a diagnosis so that we could treat her condition successfully, including faecal analysis, blood testing, ultrasonography and fine needle aspirate biopsies (needle biopsies) taken from her liver and lymph nodes.

Following these tests, Bella was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This is a condition that results in chronic persistent diarrhoea and/or vomiting in cats. It is diagnosed by the typical clinical signs and also finding evidence of inflammation in the wall of the intestines. The treatment for IBD often involves a prescription diet to reduce the reaction to particular ingredients in the food. Bella was started on a food called Feline Z-D Ultra, which is a hydrolysed prescription diet. This means that the proteins in the food have been reduced to such a small size that they are unable to cause a reaction in the intestines. Bella has also been treated with steroids (which reduce the body’s reaction to allergens) and antibiotics.

Unfortunately this is a condition that can take a while to stabilise and can be associated with regular flare ups as we can only control the symptoms rather than cure the condition. Bella is doing really well at the moment on her new diet but will need to stay on this special food for the rest of her life and may need intermittent courses of medications to keep her happy and comfortable.
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Tips on improving your senior cat’s appetite


Cats rely heavily on their ability to taste and smell food and these are both reduced in elderly cats. If your cat has a reduction in appetite it is always advised to get them checked with your vet, however sometimes it can be due to their decreased senses.




There are ways that you can encourage food intake at home, this includes the following:
  • Warming foods to 30˚c – A cat’s taste receptors are most receptive when food is at body temperature as this mimics the temperature of live prey.
  • Strong smelling foods such as fish can help encourage them to eat as a cats sense of smell may be reduced due to age.
  • Offering foods that you know they have enjoyed in the past as familiarity is important to cats.
  • Offer a different variety and consistency of foods. Often a cat that has always enjoyed biscuits may develop a preference for wet food due to dental disease causing pain. Adding water to the diet and mashing it up may encourage your cat to eat.
  • Shallow bowls that do not restrict your cat’s whisker movements are important. In the wild your cat would use their whiskers to wrap around their prey to help them bite in the appropriate location. Whiskers are also important to help cats locate food and objects that are close to their face.
  • It is also important to offer fresh, high protein diets. Cats possess taste receptors that are able to detect the amino acids produced by meat and this can help them to distinguish the nutritional quality and protein content of the food. Offering a variety of foods, including wet and dry as well as a variety of food shapes will give your cat the opportunity to choose their preference.
  • Offer food little and often, do not leave uneaten food down for long periods or lots of different food choices at once as this can be overwhelming for them. Place the food in a quiet, easily accessible part of the house.
  • Raise food bowls up on stands or boxes as this may provide more comfort for cats suffering with osteoarthritis affecting the neck.
  • Providing your cat with attention whilst they are eating can help increase appetite.
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