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Those Easter beady goodies – Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are another potential hazard to your pet at Easter. These delightful, bready goodies contain raisins, currants and sultanas which can be poisonous to our pets even in the smallest of quantities. Bear in mind to keep cakes and buns out of your pets reach.

Signs of this toxicity may include vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy, anorexia, abdominal pain, increased thirst, change in urine frequency, or dehydration.
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As spring comes round, the daffodils are out in bloom

Easter and Spring is a time of year we may associate with such plants as Daffodils.

Daffodils as well as many others bulbs, plants and house plants can be poisonous to our pets if they ingest them.

Signs of plant toxicity may include drooling, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, increased heart rate, abdominal pain, abnormal breathing or cardiac arrhythmias.

In the situation where you pet has ingested a plant, please contact your local vet immediately and bring information regarding the plant species if there is any. If there is no information what type of plant it is then bring along a photo of the plant or a piece of the plant to help identify it.
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It’s that time of year for Easter Eggs

With the Easter Weekend soon approaching, we want you and your pet to have a HOPPY EASTER and therefore during this month we will be making you aware of potential dangers to your pet.

Some of us will have started to prepare for Easter by buying Easter Eggs for the occasion. Whether it be to give to family and friends or arrange an easter egg hunt for the little ones.

Easter eggs are made of cocoa solids containing Theobromine which is the substance that is poisonous to our pets. All types of chocolate whether it is white, milk or dark chocolate can contain Theobromine but at different quantities.

Signs of chocolate toxicity can include restlessness, vomiting, diarrhoea, increased thirst, elevated heart rate, increased blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythm, tremours or increased body temperature.

In the situation where your pet has indulge in your chocolate supplies, please contact your veterinary practice immediately along with the chocolate packaging if possible to show or discuss with your vet.
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National Ferret Day

Today is National Ferret Day

Here are some fun facts about Ferrets:
  • The word ‘ferret’ is from the Latin meaning ‘Little Thief’
  • Ferrets are part of the weasel family
  • A group of ferrets is called a ‘business’
  • Ferrets are very nearsighted, but they compensate with a keen sense of hearing and smell
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Canine Hepatitis

This disease is caused by the virus (Canine Adenovirus 1) and the viral particles are spread from dog to another dog via faecal matter or saliva. When these particles are ingested by an unvaccinated dog, the virus will enter the bloodstream and infect the animal’s internal organs.

A milder cause of canine hepatitis will include such signs as lethargy, loss of appetite, fever, pain, jaundice, vomiting and diarrhoea. Further signs may develop including abnormal bleeding and swollen lymph glands. In severe cases of this disease the patient may experience seizures and shock.

With this disease, it can cause long lasting complications after they are infected. One complication of this disease is chronic hepatitis where there is ongoing liver damage. Another complication is ‘Blue Eye’ where the disease causes damage to the front chamber of the eye.

Unfortunately there is no cure to stop the virus. The patient would be provided supportive care and isolated from other patients as it is highly contagious to other dogs.

Vaccination can provide prevention of this disease. At Milton Keynes Veterinary Group, our practice protocol is to re-vaccinate against Canine Hepatitis on a 3 yearly basis following primary vaccinations, in accordance to vaccine manufacture guidance.
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