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Is your rabbit fully vaccinated?

We recommend vaccinating your rabbit against Myxomatosis and Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease (Strains 1 and 2). To cover against all these your rabbit will need two vaccines.  Both diseases are highly contagious between the rabbit population however easily prevented.

Myxomatosis is a virus carried by biting insects and mosquitos and can be passed on without direct contact. The symptoms include puffy eyelids, conjunctivitis within the first 7 days and swelling will extend around the eyes, ears and genital regions after 7 days.In severe cases the rabbit may die from the virus.
Rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease (RVHD) is a highly infectious disease that can affect domestic and wild rabbits. RVHD 1, the classic RVHD, has been present in rabbits for decades and vaccinated again. A new strain of RVHD (RVHD2) was first noted in France in 2010. In the last 12 months, it has become an increasing concern regarding this new strain of RVHD in the UK with confirmed cases.
This new strain is less aggressive than RVHD 1 and symptoms may appear from 3 to 9 days post exposure. Symptoms can include high temperature, lethargy, sudden bleeding from areas (nose/mouth), reduced appetite and possible seizures. Even though this strain is less aggressive if not treated can cause death in severe cases.
Myxomatosis and RVHD 1 are prevented by the administration of a combined vaccination. It takes 3 weeks post vaccination for the rabbit to build immunity to the viruses. This vaccination will provide the rabbit with 1 year immunity to the viruses.
RVHD 2 is prevented by the administration of a separate vaccination. There must be a 2 week gap between the two vaccinations and will provide immunity to the RVHD 2 strain for 1 year.
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Beware of FLYSTRIKE!

During the summer months, pet rabbits may be affected by maggot infestation.  Different terms are used for this but fly strike is the most common.

Healthy rabbits are generally not affected by fly strike. There are three main problems that lead to the condition. First, a wound to which the flies are attracted and on which they lay their eggs is an obvious site where maggots can cause damage. More commonly, a rabbit that cannot take and eat its soft faeces caecotrophs (either due to arthritis or obesity) will quickly have matted and soiled fur around its anus. This, from the fly’s point of view, is an ideal opportunity to lay eggs. When the maggots hatch they spread from the area (commonly up the abdomen) and may cause a tremendous amount of damage as they eat through the tissues while the rabbit is still living. Thirdly, damp bedding is an ideal environment for egg-laying and maggot growth and development; these may then migrate onto the rabbit. This is a fatal condition if not treated.
The key factors in preventing fly strike are to ensure that bedding is clean and dry, and that daily cleaning of toilet areas is carried out; the whole accommodation should be completely emptied and disinfected 1-2 times weekly. Checks of your rabbit should be carried out twice daily, if you find any wounds or ulcerated areas of skin then please seek veterinary attention. A rabbit owner should also make sure that their rabbit is able to keep it bottom clean, if the rabbit keeps soiling itself, then there is usually a health reason as to why e.g. obesity or arthritis. If a rabbit is unable to keep itself clean, then please seek veterinary advice.
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Rabbit Awareness Week

This year Rabbit Awareness Week is happening between 19th-24th June.

During this week, we are running FREE Rabbit Health Checks with our Veterinary Nurses, Louise Martin and Cara Palacio, at our Walnut Tree Hospital. The clinics will be available during the week at selected times. Our nurses will discuss general husbandry, diet, weight, vaccinations and dental disease and answer any questions you may have. To book an appointment, please speak to reception or call on 01908 397777. For more information on Rabbit Awareness Week, please visit www.rabbitawarenessweek.co.uk.
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World Blood Donor Day

Today, Wednesday 14th June, We are joining Pet Blood Bank UK in celebrating World Blood Donor day! We are recognising brilliant, heroic hounds across the country who help save lives by donating blood. Just like people, sick animals often need blood transfusions. In many cases a blood transfusion can save an animals life! Blood is used for many purposes including trauma,surgery and disease. One donation of blood can save up to four lives.
We have been holding sessions with Pet Blood Bank since February 2016 and would love to welcome more life savers to our next session on Saturday 12th August. To register,please visit www.petbloodbankuk.org or call the surgery on 01908 397777 and ask for Jess. Please help us spread the word on this important day.
Below are just a few of our amazing donors. # Heroic Hounds ❤
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Our Veterinary Team has grown

During the start of 2017, we welcomed two new additions to our veterinary team expanding and increasing our knowledge and expertise.

Heather Fordham joined us as a Saturday vet initially, however has now increased her hours with us. Heather graduated from Glasgow University in 1988 and has a special interest in feline and chicken medicine. Outside of work, she is a big netball enthusiast along with having two children, two cats and a husband to look after.
 
 

Marina Crockford joined us in January this year on a full-time basis after previously working in Cardiff for the last 29 years. She has a strong interest in surgery including orthopaedics. In her spare time, Marina likes to hit the slopes in the winter and go cycling for the rest of the year.
 
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