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Cat Vaccinations – what does it protect against?

Your cat’s annual vaccination protects your cat against the following diseases:

  • Feline Panleucopenia
    • This disease is caused by parvovirus and is highly contagious. It can be spread easily from cat to cat and excreted in faeces and bodily fluids.
    • Symptoms can include gastrointestinal signs, fever, loss of appetite, depression and anaemia.
  • ‘Cat Flu’
    • Feline herpesvirus and feline calicivirus are the two main causes of ‘cat flu’. It spreads through air droplets of infected cats sneezing or via nasal and eye discharge. It can also be spread through direct contact with an infected cat or via a person’s clothing.
    • Symptoms will include fever, lack of appetite, lethargy, discharge from eyes and nose, sneezing and mouth ulcers.
  • Feline leukaemia virus
    • This virus is found worldwide and is spread through mutual grooming and bite wounds as it is contained in body fluids.
    • Symptoms can include fever, lethargy, poor coat condition, weight loss, anaemia and gastrointestinal signs.
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Dog Vaccinations – what does it protect against?

Your dog’s annual vaccination protects your pet against:

  • Canine Distemper 
    • caused by Canine Distemper Virus and is spread by contact with affected dogs.
    • Symptoms include nasal discharge, sneezing, difficulty breathing, cough.
  • Infectious Canine Hepatitis
    • caused by the virus canine Adenovirus Type 1 (CAV-1) and usually spread through contact with the disease in the environment rather than dog to dog contact.
    • Symptoms include lethargy, high temperature, gastrointestinal signs, jaundice and painful abdomen.
  • Canine Parvovirus
    • caused by Canine Parvovirus type 2 CPV-2 and is spread through contact with the virus in the environment or dog to dog contact. This virus is highly contagious in all unvaccinated animals.
    • Symptoms include gastrointestinal signs, anaemia, shock and dehydration.
  • Leptospirosis
    • caused by the bacteria Leptospira. It can be spread by direct contact with infected urine or contaminated water.
    • Symptoms include fever, gastrointestinal signs, jaundice, dark urine and dehydration.

Your dog can also be protected against Kennel Cough with an additional vaccine. 

  • Kennel Cough 
    • a number of viruses have been associated with kennel cough including parainfluenza and most commonly Bordetella bronchiseptica. It is spread through direct contact with an infected dog or an environment where an infected dog has been housed.
    • Symptoms include sneezing, snorting, gagging and distinctive cough.
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MK Vet Group Staff go Dragon Boating!

On Monday 5th June, our staff took to the water in the unfortunate wet and windy weather at Caldecotte Lake. However, the weather did not dampen our spirits.
Sonia, one of our vets and Laura Austin, our head nurse, are keen dragon boaters and put the rest of us through our paces.
The session was thoroughly enjoyed by all and we are hoping to enter a team at an event next year.
  
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Is your rabbit fully vaccinated?

We recommend vaccinating your rabbit against Myxomatosis and Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease (Strains 1 and 2). To cover against all these your rabbit will need two vaccines.  Both diseases are highly contagious between the rabbit population however easily prevented.

Myxomatosis is a virus carried by biting insects and mosquitos and can be passed on without direct contact. The symptoms include puffy eyelids, conjunctivitis within the first 7 days and swelling will extend around the eyes, ears and genital regions after 7 days.In severe cases the rabbit may die from the virus.
Rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease (RVHD) is a highly infectious disease that can affect domestic and wild rabbits. RVHD 1, the classic RVHD, has been present in rabbits for decades and vaccinated again. A new strain of RVHD (RVHD2) was first noted in France in 2010. In the last 12 months, it has become an increasing concern regarding this new strain of RVHD in the UK with confirmed cases.
This new strain is less aggressive than RVHD 1 and symptoms may appear from 3 to 9 days post exposure. Symptoms can include high temperature, lethargy, sudden bleeding from areas (nose/mouth), reduced appetite and possible seizures. Even though this strain is less aggressive if not treated can cause death in severe cases.
Myxomatosis and RVHD 1 are prevented by the administration of a combined vaccination. It takes 3 weeks post vaccination for the rabbit to build immunity to the viruses. This vaccination will provide the rabbit with 1 year immunity to the viruses.
RVHD 2 is prevented by the administration of a separate vaccination. There must be a 2 week gap between the two vaccinations and will provide immunity to the RVHD 2 strain for 1 year.
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Beware of FLYSTRIKE!

During the summer months, pet rabbits may be affected by maggot infestation.  Different terms are used for this but fly strike is the most common.

Healthy rabbits are generally not affected by fly strike. There are three main problems that lead to the condition. First, a wound to which the flies are attracted and on which they lay their eggs is an obvious site where maggots can cause damage. More commonly, a rabbit that cannot take and eat its soft faeces caecotrophs (either due to arthritis or obesity) will quickly have matted and soiled fur around its anus. This, from the fly’s point of view, is an ideal opportunity to lay eggs. When the maggots hatch they spread from the area (commonly up the abdomen) and may cause a tremendous amount of damage as they eat through the tissues while the rabbit is still living. Thirdly, damp bedding is an ideal environment for egg-laying and maggot growth and development; these may then migrate onto the rabbit. This is a fatal condition if not treated.
The key factors in preventing fly strike are to ensure that bedding is clean and dry, and that daily cleaning of toilet areas is carried out; the whole accommodation should be completely emptied and disinfected 1-2 times weekly. Checks of your rabbit should be carried out twice daily, if you find any wounds or ulcerated areas of skin then please seek veterinary attention. A rabbit owner should also make sure that their rabbit is able to keep it bottom clean, if the rabbit keeps soiling itself, then there is usually a health reason as to why e.g. obesity or arthritis. If a rabbit is unable to keep itself clean, then please seek veterinary advice.
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