• Free kitten treatment
  • aesthetic
  • aesthetic
  • Free kitten treatment
  • aesthetic
  • aesthetic

National Pet Month

WHAT IS NATIONAL PET MONTH?

This month is a celebration of our animal friends. National Pet Month is a registered charity with the aim for promoting responsible pet ownership. They also aim to bring together pet lovers from all walks of life.

THE AIMS OF NATIONAL PET MONTH
  • Promote responsible pet ownership
  • Increase the awareness of the roles of pet care specialists
  • Raise the awareness of the benefits of owning a pet
  • Highlight the value of assistance and working companion animals
Find out more about National Pet Month by visiting www.nationalpetmonth.org.uk. As part of National Pet Month, we would like to introduce you to our MKVG pet family.
  • <

Models Needed for 2019 Calendar

So this year, Milton Keynes Veterinary Group are eager to organise a charity calendar (charities are yet to be confirmed). Therefore we would like your best pet photo (must be excellent quality). We are aiming to get as many pets as possible on the calendar and we also need seasonal pictures:

  • Christmas
  • Halloween
  • Spring time
  • Easter
  • Valentines
Please send any photo’s you have and want to submit for consideration for the calendar to the address below:

mkvetgroup.photos@gmail.com

We look forward to seeing all your photos.

  • <

Jill Jab Booking

Would you be interested in the Jill Jab for your ferret?

In recent years, reproductive management advice for ferrets has changed.

Jill ferrets reach sexual maturity in the first spring after birth. Increased day length stimulates oestrus in the Jill between March – September. The Jill ferret will remain in oestrus until she is mated or until day length decreases.

Remaining in oestrus for long periods of time can cause serious life-threatening illness in the Jill. The hormones which cause oestrus also suppress the production of blood cells. If this goes on for a long period of time, the Jill can become severely anaemic. The aim of breeding control in Jills is to prevent illness due to prolonged oestrus and to prevent unwanted litters.

The Jill Jab is an injection of Proligesterone that can be used to suppress oestrus in the Jill. This is traditionally referred to as the ‘Jill jab.’ This injection is given when the Jill first comes into oestrus, usually in March. A single injection once yearly is sufficient for most Jills. However, some Jills will come back into oestrus 3-5 months later and will require a second injection in July. Jills must be closely monitored for signs of returning to oestrus.

We are eager to hold a Jill Jab clinic at one of our branches with our small furries veterinary surgeon Pav Brain. Unfortunately this injection is only available in a multidose vial and needs to be used within 4 hours of opening and therefore we need to group ferrets together.

Express your interest in the Jill Jab for your Ferret

This form is not a confirmed booking, what we trying to establish is how much of the Jill Jab we need to order to cover everyone who wishes to have the Jab for their Ferret. A practice manager will be in touch to confirm dates and times to bring your Ferret to one of our branches.

*Your Name

*Your Surname

*Your Email

*Your tel

Please tick if you are interested in visiting us for the Jill Jab for your Ferret?
Yes

*How many Ferrets do you have?

  • <

Breeding Control in Ferrets

In recent years, reproductive management advice for ferrets has changed. This information guide outlines some of the factors you may want to consider when deciding upon the best breeding management strategy for your ferrets.

Reasons for controlling breeding in ferrets
  1. Jill Ferrets

  2. Jill ferrets reach sexual maturity in the first spring after birth. Increased day length stimulates oestrus in the Jill between March – September. The Jill ferret will remain in oestrus until she is mated or until day length decreases.
    Remaining in oestrus for long periods of time can cause serious life-threatening illness in the Jill. The hormones which cause oestrus also suppress the production of blood cells. If this goes on for a long period of time, the Jill can become severely anaemic.
    The aim of breeding control in Jills is to prevent illness due to prolonged oestrus and to prevent unwanted litters.

  3. Hob Ferrets

  4. Hob ferrets reach sexual maturity at 9 months of age. During the breeding period, Hobs produce increased musk and skin secretions. This increases their smell and causes a sticky, greasy coat. Hobs are much more aggressive towards other ferrets during this period. They will fight with other males and bite females when attempting to breed.
    The aim of breeding control in Hobs is to prevent unwanted litters, reduce aggression and reduce smell/skin secretions to allow increased handling.

Options for Breeding Control

Jill Ferrets
  1. Neutering – Jill ferrets can be neutered or ‘spayed,’ by which procedure the ovaries and uterus are removed. Historically, neutering was the procedure of choice for the Jill. However, it has now been shown that neutering ferrets increases their risk of developing adrenal gland tumours. For this reason, we no longer advise neutering as the procedure of choice. Some owners still consider neutering the best option for breeding management. In these cases, Jills should be neutered in the first spring following birth. In these Jills, we advise placing a hormonal implant at the time of neutering to prevent the development of adrenal tumours (see below).
  2. Hormonal Implant – A hormonal implant can be placed under the skin of the Jill prior to the first oestrus (at 9 months of age). This implant will last 18-24 months and should be replaced when signs of oestrus recur. This implant is licensed in the Hob but is used off-license in the Jill. It has been used for many years in the Jill with no reported side-effects and is now the procedure of choice.
  3. The Jill Jab – An injection of Proligesterone can be used to suppress oestrus in the Jill. This is traditionally referred to as the ‘Jill jab.’ This injection is given when the Jill first comes into oestrus, usually in March. A single injection once yearly is sufficient for most Jills. However, some Jills will come back into oestrus 3-5 months later and will require a second injection in July. Jills must be closely monitored for signs of returning to oestrus.
  4. Teaser Males – A vasectomised Hob may be kept to mate with jills in oestrus and take them out of season. 75% OF Jills are taken out of oestrus after one mating. However, the Hob can be quite aggressive towards the Jill during mating, which can result in injuries to the Jill. Mating without fertilization causes pseudopregnancy in the Jill. Jills in pseudopregnancy can show increased aggression towards their owner and towards other ferrets. As the vasectomised Hob is entire, he will display the behaviour and smell of an entire male ferret.
Hob Ferrets
  1. Neutering – Hob ferrets can be ‘castrated,’ by which procedure their testes are removed. This will prevent all of the problems associated with keeping a male ferret as a pet. However, just as in Jills, neutering the Hob predisposes him to the development of adrenal tumours. For this reason, neutering is no longer considered the procedure of choice for Hobs. If the Hob is neutered, we would advise placing a hormonal implant at the time of surgery to prevent the development of adrenal tumours.
  2. Hormonal Implant – A hormonal implant can be placed under the skin of the Hob to produce a ‘chemical castration.’ Depending upon the size of the implant, this can last up to 4 years. The implant has all the benefits of castration and will also prevent the development of adrenal tumours. It is the procedure of choice in ferrets.

We hope you have found this information useful. Please contact us at MKVG if you would like to discuss breeding management in your ferret.
  • <

Mammary Tumours in Rats

Mammary tumours are incredibly common in rats and most owners are very familiar with encountering these growths on their pets. However, many owners are not aware of the different options that are available for the treatment of mammary tumours in rats.

Why are mammary tumours so common in rats?
Mammary tumours grow in rats due to the presence of a hormone called Prolactin. This hormone is secreted during the normal oestrus cycle of the rat. It can also be secreted by the mammary tumour itself and by tumours of the pituitary gland. Secretion of Prolactin increases as rats age. Factors which affect the development of mammary tumours in rats include the genetic strain of the rat, the diet, the hormonal status and the age of the rat. Mammary tumours may affect up to 90% of intact female rats and 16% of intact males over one year of age. Approximately 80% of mammary tumours in rats are benign but 20% are malignant.
How can mammary tumours be treated?
All mammary tumours should be surgically removed as early as possible. Benign tumours can usually be completely removed at the time of surgery but this is difficult to achieve with malignant tumours. Alongside surgical removal of the tumour, we can now offer some other options to reduce the likelihood of any future mammary tumour growth. These are:
  1. Placing a hormone implant under the skin. The implant prevents the secretion of Prolactin, which means that mammary tumours are unable to develop. This can be placed at the time of surgery. Alternatively, this can be placed in young female rats to prevent development of mammary tissue.
  2. Neutering. Females can be spayed and males castrated. This removes the influence of Prolactin. NB: These methods are not effective if a pituitary tumour is the source of the prolactin. Also, this will not prevent regrowth or spread of malignant mammary tumour.
  3. Medication to reduce the secretion of Prolactin. This will remove the influence of Prolactin on mammary tissue. This can be effective even if a pituitary tumour is present.
  4. Diet and environment. Reducing the calorie content of the diet and environmental enrichment will reduce the likelihood of mammary tumours recurring.
If you would like to discuss any of these treatment options, please contact us at MKVG.
  • <
mkvetgroup-facebook   mkvetgroup-instagram   mkvetgroup-google   mkvetgroup-youtube