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Exciting New Equipment at Milton Keynes Veterinary Group

Earlier this year Heine, manufacturers of high quality diagnostic equipment, asked for veterinary ophthalmologists who would be happy to trial their IC2 Fundoscope (more later) for veterinary use.

We are delighted to be one of the few General practices in the country who have been asked to trial it.
The funduscope attaches to an iphone and enables visualisation (and photography) of the retina (fundus). The right-hand picture shows a human fundus when viewed through the IC2 (boring!)



It is early days yet and we are still learning but we have already had some quite good photos. There is a difference between what we see and what we actually get to photograph
Here are some photos (not ours) of a normal cat and dog fundus.

Pictures have been taken from Keith Barnett’s superb Diagnostic Atlas of Veterinary Ophthalmology.

You can see how they are much more exciting than the human (primate) ones! The colourful reflective part is the tapetum, hence “cat’s eyes“ (but could as easily have been dogs).

Dogs have blood vessels which cross the optic nerve head while cats do not, a common exam question for veterinary students. The far easier way to establish which species is to check out the animal before you look in their eyes.
Here are some photos we have taken.


This is both eyes of “Amber” who has been blind in the right eye (LHS) for many years. The dark “halo” around the optic nerve head gives us a reason why.

On the LHS we have a bit (oops) of the optic nerve head of a normal young dog. On the RHS we have “Hugo” an ageing cocker spaniel who is unfortunately suffering with retinal degeneration and going blind. You can see how the blood vessels are much less (atrophy) and the “shiny” part indicates retinal thinning enabling the tapetum to reflect more light.

Here we have the right and left eyes of “Mampi” who suffering from hypertension unfortunately suffered a total retinal detachment and haemorrhage in his right eye and partial detachments in his left.

In his right eye the top arrow points to a retinal bleed (post detachment), while the bottom arrow shows “perivascular cuffing” which is caused by leakage from the vessels due to the hypertension. In his left eye we can see dark “dead” patches of retina caused due to bullous (like little blisters) detachments of the retina.

These photos are all after treatment which has brought his blood pressure back to normal. His retina in his right eye is now mainly reattached but you can see the damage that has already occurred.
Finally to show that humans aren’t the only species with relatively boring retinae.
These pictures from David Williams Chapter 27 in Gelatt’s Veterinary Ophthalmology show two normal rabbut fundi, the left hand one being an albino.

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