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Posts Tagged ‘milton keynes vet group’

Veterinary Nursing Awareness Month



This May is Veterinary Nursing Awareness Month which aims to spread the word about the importance of the role of the veterinary nurse in practice and the provision of responsible pet care to the general public.

Our Veterinary Nurses are extremely important on a day to day basis and we are extremely thankful for their hard-work and dedication.




Did you know that a Veterinary Nurse can….
  • Position patients for X-rays and ultrasounds
  • Take blood samples
  • Place intravenous catheters
  • Place urinary catheters
  • Monitor critical patients
  • Carry out minor surgical procedures such as removing a lipoma (fatty lump)
  • Using the microscope to evaluate all manner of samples
  • Calculate the exact number of calories a patient needs per day, along with fluid requirements and urinary output
  • Assist the Vet in surgical procedures
  • Revive neonates (puppies and kittens!) during a caesarian section
  • Assist with CPR of patients who have undergone cardiac arrest
  • Administer all manner of medication (be it oral, topical, under the skin, into a muscle or vein)
  • Administer oxygen therapy to patients who may be experiencing difficulty breathing
  • Carry out nursing consultations
  • Administer second vaccinations
  • Take blood pressure readings
  • Update owners of patients who are staying with us for longer periods of time and arrange visits
  • Triage emergency cases
  • Support owners through the times where euthanising their pet may be necessary, and ensuring that your pet is always treated with dignity
  • Giving advice on behavioural problems
  • Keep the practice clean and tidy and ensure everybody has had enough tea / coffee
  • Ensuring that we have enough stock of all the drugs and consumables used on a day to day basis
  • Help on the reception desk, advising clients over the phone
… This is just the start! Aren’t we busy bee’s?
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Cheeky’s Trip to MK Vet Group Cat Clinic

Cheeky visited us at our Stoke Road cat clinic last month as he needed dental treatment. He was lucky enough to be the only cat having a procedure that day so it was nice and quiet and got lots of fuss from our team. Cheeky was provided with a cat castle to provide a place to feel safe and secure and we also use Feliway diffusers which release pheromones to help our patients feel relaxed.

Prior to Cheeky’s anaesthetic, he was given a premedication to provide pain relief prior to his dental and make him relax. Once the premedication had taken effect, he was given an injectable anaesthetic to induce anaesthesia and maintained on anaesthetic gas throughout the dental. Throughout the anaesthetic, Cheeky was monitored by our nurse and connected to monitoring equipment including ECG, capnography and blood pressure monitoring.

Before any extractions, the vet will assess the teeth and take x-rays to assess the roots which are under the gum line. After assessment, Cheeky had to have 8 teeth extracted which were found to be diseased. The x-rays also showed that Cheeky had a condition called pulpitis which was affecting one of his canines. Pulpitis is inflammation of the dental pulp tissue. The pulp contains bloods vessels, nerves and connective tissue, supplying the tooth’s blood and nutrients. Pulpitis is usually a secondary complication of a fractured or chipped tooth.

After Cheeky’s dental, he was placed into a recovery area and monitored by our nurse until he was awake. Cheeky has now recovered well and regained his appetite!

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Are you Lungworm Aware?

WHAT IS LUNGWORM?

Lungworm otherwise known as Angiostrongylus Vasorum in dogs, and Aelurpstrongylus Abstrusus in cats. This parasite resides in the heart and pulmonary arteries and can therefore be fatal. There has been an increase in recorded canine Lungworm cases, but it is still less common than other dog parasites such as flea, ticks and worms. Feline lungworm cases are currently rare, but more cases are confirmed each year.

HOW CAN YOUR PET GET LUNGWORM?

Dogs become infected by this parasite through the ingestion of infected slugs and snails. You may not necessary see your pet ingest any slugs or snails, as they may do it accidently when eating grass or drinking from outdoor water bowls. Cats who hunt birds and rodents will be at a higher risk of ingesting this parasite.

HOW CAN IT BE DIAGNOSED?

Lungworm can be diagnosed by:
  • Blood test
  • Faecal test
  • X-ray
  • Bronchoscopy

HOW WILL YOUR PET BE AFFECTED BY LUNGWORM?

Canine symptoms can vary between cases, the most common signs are: coughing, lethargy, weight loss, poor appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea, excess bleeding from minor wounds and seizures.
Felines may never show signs that they are affected by Lungworm, however if symptoms do occur they can include coughing, difficulty breathing and poor body condition.

WHAT IS THE TREATMENT FOR LUNGWORM?

Treatment is available for Lungworm cases in the form of a monthly prescription only treatment, which kills the L4 Lungworm larvae as well as other intestinal worms and fleas. However, in severe cases, this condition may be hard to treat.

PREVENTION IS KEY with Lungworm.

Here are some tips to help
  • Pick up the poop – Lungworm larvae is passed out in your pets faeces and therefore picking up after our pets prevents spread of the parasites
  • Pick up their toys – toys that left outdoors will be exposed to slugs and snails, increasing the risk of parasite spread
  • Don’t leave their food and water bowls outside – these will be exposed to slugs and snails increasing risk to your pet.
  • Monthly prescription only worming treatment will protect your pet against Lungworm and reduce its spread. Not all spot on treatments treat against Lungworm, so please contact us for advice. Unfortunately at present, there is no licensed preventive treatment for cat lungworm. Lungworm prevention for dog is included in our Pet Health Care plans.
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Meet loveable Jasper….

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group would like to introduce you to Jasper, the beautiful blind dog. Jasper started life as a Guide Dog, but after losing both his eyes to Glaucoma, he was forced to retire at just six years old. Being blind doesn’t stop Jasper from leading a full and happy life with his owner, Janyce, and they have learnt to cope together, building new skills for Jasper and exploring his new world. Read on for Janyce and Jaspers story in her own words

“Jasper worked for my son’s father, David, so I have known him for years. He had to retire, aged 6, when he lost his right eye to glaucoma. I said yes when David asked if I’d like to give Jasper his retirement home, knowing that there was a possibility Jasper could lose the other eye too, which he did, just six months later. He’s been with me since last September. He’s a lovely dog. Very polite, very friendly and good natured with everyone, and so affectionate. I was very worried he’d lose that when he went blind, and that I wouldn’t be able to cope and I’d have to give him back to Guide Dogs, but it has been fine. We have learned together. The people at Guide Dogs were brilliant, making sure Jasper saw a specialist and got the very best treatment, and that what was done was right for him. Jasper was more confident walking on his car harness, so I bought him a Ruffwear Webmaster harness at the start (a strong harness with a handle). I think that has been a really good investment for him. We had a couple of dodgy weeks at the beginning, when he was very reluctant to move around. Guide Dogs are trained not to move when there might be danger and he lost all his confidence. He became very focused on me, leaning up against me as we walked and almost tripping me up. Gradually he became more confident, walking to the end of a lead and stopping leaning on me as we walked, but he was very hesitant and would come back after a few paces. He’s had to learn a lot of new skills and unlearn the guide dog rules. His guide dog training has helped him to be a confident blind dog as he is so obedient and he listens to me when I give commands. But he also gets overconfident sometimes, and he’s very strong and pulls really hard when he recognises his mates (human and canine!). I’ve met a lot of partially sighted and blind dogs in person and through the Blind Dogs Facebook group, who cope brilliantly. Jasper gets a lot of attention when he’s out, he’s very good at making friends. He has a BLIND DOG collar and leash, people often don’t realise he is completely blind as he manages so well. He’ll say hello to a dog, find their human, sniff out the treat pocket and then sit next to it. He knows how to work his disability, usually smiling at the human until they give in and give him one of their treats. Jasper’s a bright boy and picked some things up very quickly. For example, the word “watch” will stop him in his tracks and he’ll turn around and return to me. He knows his way around the house, and when we are out walking he’s usually off the lead, but he doesn’t go very far from me. But I was concerned Jasper wasn’t getting enough exercise. He was healthy but he’d become quite unfit, now he’s getting more exercise with his ball. Just after Jasper went blind, I met another Lab who was blind from cataracts and who was retrieving a ball on a rope, so I knew it was possible. We tried fetch on and off without any kind of enthusiasm from Jasper, although he’d find his squeaky toys and bring them to me at home. I was quite worried about boredom and that everything was focused on food. Then he started going to scent classes a couple of months ago, at the suggestion of Guide Dogs, and he’s really enjoyed it. The other weekend, I thought we’d have another go at retrieving, and it finally clicked with him. He’s moving quickly and confidently and really enjoying it. I’ve not seen him so enthusiastic about something for quite some time, he’s loving it. He even does a version of the excited doggy dance before I throw it again, and he dances in circles when he’s found it. He’s a Lab with a ball, he’s got a job and purpose again. He’s very pleased with himself and a very happy dog.”
See more videos of Jasper on our YouTube page – Milton Keynes Veterinary Group.

Credit to Janyce Quigley

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