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Posts Tagged ‘milton keynes veterinary group’

Congratulations Caroline!

MK Vet Group would like to congratulate our Cat Clinic nurse Caroline on passing her International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) Diploma in Feline Nursing with a Distinction earlier this year! We are all extremely proud of her and her effort that she has dedicated to the course.

The Feline Nursing course provides nurses with the skills to improve the welfare and understanding of cats in their care.
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Protecting your pet against those Pesky Parasites

FLEAS are a small, wingless insects, just a few millimetres long with hind legs modified for jumping. The majority of the flea life cycle will occur off the animal, but can easily occur in the home. The fleas lay their eggs on the animal, which then fall off into the environment (e.g. onto bedding or carpets). Only 5% of the flea population is actually on the animal, the remaining 95% is in the environment in form of eggs, larvae and pupae.

HOW IS YOUR PET AFFECTED?

Fleas will bite cats, dogs, rabbits and even humans. You may notice your pet is scratching, licking or biting a lot, has unusual red patches of skin, signs of hair loss or flea dirt. Flea dirt looks like tiny black dots and can be identified by a simple quick test:
  • Take a piece of paper towel and dampen
  • Rub gently on your pets fur where you suspect there is flea dirt
  • If the black dots change to a reddish-brown colour – FLEAS ARE PRESENT!
Some animals may suffer from flea allergic dermatitis (FAD), which is irritation of the skin directly related to the presence of fleas, and a strict flea prevention routine should be followed to alleviate the symptoms.

HOW TO HELP YOUR PET AGAINST FLEAS?

Treat your pet with a prescription flea product as directed by the manufacturer or your veterinary surgeon. These can be in a variety of forms, such as spot-ons, collars or tablets. Speak to our staff about our Pet Health Care plans to make sure your pet gets the best prevention at the most affordable prices or find out more here. With a heavy infestation of fleas, don’t forget to treat the environment as well. Remember those fleas can live in bedding, sofas, beds, carpets, car, etc. so it’s just as important to treat the home as it is the pet!

TICKS are commonly found in long grass, and attach themselves to your pet as they brush passed. They are eight legged and are composed of two body sections. Their highly developed mouthparts allow them to pierce a pet’s skin and feed on the animal’s blood, sometimes causing reactions at the site of attachment. Severe infestations can lead to anaemia in young animals. Ticks are associated with Lyme Disease, Babesiosis and Ehrlichiosis.

HOW TO HELP YOUR PET AGAINST TICKS?

Prevent Ticks by using a prescription tick product as directed by the manufacturer or your veterinary surgeon. Products can be in a variety of forms such as collars, tablets or spot on treatments. Protection against Ticks is now included within our Pet Health Plan, find out more here.

If you have any questions about these parasites or prevention, our staff would be happy to help.
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What is the risk of Lungworm in your area?

Lungworm is a parasite that can lead to serious health problems in dogs and cats. If the parasite is undetected it can be fatal if not treated.

Dogs and cats become infected by ingesting infected slugs and snails carrying the lungworm larvae. Dogs and cats of all ages and breeds can become infected with lungworm however the younger animals tend to be more prone due to their inquisitive nature.

The practice periodically reviews the parasitic products it chooses to match the parasite risk and give the best cover for dogs and cats at any one time. Our staff will advise you on a safe and effective product.

THE LUNGWORM MAP

The Lungworm Map shows reported cases by vets and owners across the United Kingdom. The MK postcode currently have 37 reported cases and the map is regularly updated with new cases. However even if there are no reported cases in your area, your pet may still be at risk. Visit the Lungworm Map here.

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Jill Jab Booking

Would you be interested in the Jill Jab for your ferret?

In recent years, reproductive management advice for ferrets has changed.

Jill ferrets reach sexual maturity in the first spring after birth. Increased day length stimulates oestrus in the Jill between March – September. The Jill ferret will remain in oestrus until she is mated or until day length decreases.

Remaining in oestrus for long periods of time can cause serious life-threatening illness in the Jill. The hormones which cause oestrus also suppress the production of blood cells. If this goes on for a long period of time, the Jill can become severely anaemic. The aim of breeding control in Jills is to prevent illness due to prolonged oestrus and to prevent unwanted litters.

The Jill Jab is an injection of Proligesterone that can be used to suppress oestrus in the Jill. This is traditionally referred to as the ‘Jill jab.’ This injection is given when the Jill first comes into oestrus, usually in March. A single injection once yearly is sufficient for most Jills. However, some Jills will come back into oestrus 3-5 months later and will require a second injection in July. Jills must be closely monitored for signs of returning to oestrus.

We are eager to hold a Jill Jab clinic at one of our branches with our small furries veterinary surgeon Pav Brain. Unfortunately this injection is only available in a multidose vial and needs to be used within 4 hours of opening and therefore we need to group ferrets together.

Express your interest in the Jill Jab for your Ferret

This form is not a confirmed booking, what we trying to establish is how much of the Jill Jab we need to order to cover everyone who wishes to have the Jab for their Ferret. A practice manager will be in touch to confirm dates and times to bring your Ferret to one of our branches.

*Your Name

*Your Surname

*Your Email

*Your tel

Please tick if you are interested in visiting us for the Jill Jab for your Ferret?
Yes

*How many Ferrets do you have?

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Breeding Control in Ferrets

In recent years, reproductive management advice for ferrets has changed. This information guide outlines some of the factors you may want to consider when deciding upon the best breeding management strategy for your ferrets.

Reasons for controlling breeding in ferrets
  1. Jill Ferrets

  2. Jill ferrets reach sexual maturity in the first spring after birth. Increased day length stimulates oestrus in the Jill between March – September. The Jill ferret will remain in oestrus until she is mated or until day length decreases.
    Remaining in oestrus for long periods of time can cause serious life-threatening illness in the Jill. The hormones which cause oestrus also suppress the production of blood cells. If this goes on for a long period of time, the Jill can become severely anaemic.
    The aim of breeding control in Jills is to prevent illness due to prolonged oestrus and to prevent unwanted litters.

  3. Hob Ferrets

  4. Hob ferrets reach sexual maturity at 9 months of age. During the breeding period, Hobs produce increased musk and skin secretions. This increases their smell and causes a sticky, greasy coat. Hobs are much more aggressive towards other ferrets during this period. They will fight with other males and bite females when attempting to breed.
    The aim of breeding control in Hobs is to prevent unwanted litters, reduce aggression and reduce smell/skin secretions to allow increased handling.

Options for Breeding Control

Jill Ferrets
  1. Neutering – Jill ferrets can be neutered or ‘spayed,’ by which procedure the ovaries and uterus are removed. Historically, neutering was the procedure of choice for the Jill. However, it has now been shown that neutering ferrets increases their risk of developing adrenal gland tumours. For this reason, we no longer advise neutering as the procedure of choice. Some owners still consider neutering the best option for breeding management. In these cases, Jills should be neutered in the first spring following birth. In these Jills, we advise placing a hormonal implant at the time of neutering to prevent the development of adrenal tumours (see below).
  2. Hormonal Implant – A hormonal implant can be placed under the skin of the Jill prior to the first oestrus (at 9 months of age). This implant will last 18-24 months and should be replaced when signs of oestrus recur. This implant is licensed in the Hob but is used off-license in the Jill. It has been used for many years in the Jill with no reported side-effects and is now the procedure of choice.
  3. The Jill Jab – An injection of Proligesterone can be used to suppress oestrus in the Jill. This is traditionally referred to as the ‘Jill jab.’ This injection is given when the Jill first comes into oestrus, usually in March. A single injection once yearly is sufficient for most Jills. However, some Jills will come back into oestrus 3-5 months later and will require a second injection in July. Jills must be closely monitored for signs of returning to oestrus.
  4. Teaser Males – A vasectomised Hob may be kept to mate with jills in oestrus and take them out of season. 75% OF Jills are taken out of oestrus after one mating. However, the Hob can be quite aggressive towards the Jill during mating, which can result in injuries to the Jill. Mating without fertilization causes pseudopregnancy in the Jill. Jills in pseudopregnancy can show increased aggression towards their owner and towards other ferrets. As the vasectomised Hob is entire, he will display the behaviour and smell of an entire male ferret.
Hob Ferrets
  1. Neutering – Hob ferrets can be ‘castrated,’ by which procedure their testes are removed. This will prevent all of the problems associated with keeping a male ferret as a pet. However, just as in Jills, neutering the Hob predisposes him to the development of adrenal tumours. For this reason, neutering is no longer considered the procedure of choice for Hobs. If the Hob is neutered, we would advise placing a hormonal implant at the time of surgery to prevent the development of adrenal tumours.
  2. Hormonal Implant – A hormonal implant can be placed under the skin of the Hob to produce a ‘chemical castration.’ Depending upon the size of the implant, this can last up to 4 years. The implant has all the benefits of castration and will also prevent the development of adrenal tumours. It is the procedure of choice in ferrets.

We hope you have found this information useful. Please contact us at MKVG if you would like to discuss breeding management in your ferret.
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