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Posts Tagged ‘Pets’

Summer Dangers

During the warmer weather, we want you and your pets to enjoy it! However here are some things to keep them safe:
  • TICKS
    There are higher numbers of ticks during the summer months, and animals will be outside more often therefore a higher likelihood of picking up a tick along the way. It is a good idea to check your pet for ticks at least once a day. Dogs tend to pick ticks up more often than cats, but we advise to check your cat daily as well. Ticks can transmit a number of diseases, with symptoms that are hard to spot. Our staff would be happy to advise you on a safe and effective product to use against ticks.

  • TOADS
    The Common toad and the Natterjack toad are common within the UK, within the forests and wet areas. Toads are poisonous to pets as they release venom from their skin when licked or eaten. Exposures are normally seen between June and August time of the year. Signs may include: vomiting, frothing or foaming at the mouth, increased salivation, shaking, oral pain and collapse.

  • HOT WEATHER
    If your pet is exercised too much or they are left in a car, conservatory or enclosed space, temperatures can suddenly rise and lead to fatal heat stroke. Animals should not be exercised during the hottest part of the day and never be left in a confined space for any length of time.

  • PAVEMENTS AND ROADS
    Studies have shown pavements and roads can reach temperatures of 52oC on warm days, which is enough to severely burn your dog’s paws. As a test, place the back of your hand on the surface for seven seconds – if this is too hot for you, then it is too hot for your pet!

  • BLUE-GREEN ALGAE
    This is a bacteria which forms on top of ponds and lakes, which gives a blue-green scum appearance to the surface of the water. This bacteria cannot be seen with the naked eye unless it is clumped together. It is most commonly present in non-flowing fresh water such as lakes and ponds. Symptoms of blue-green algae poisoning can include vomiting, diarrhoea, seizures, weakness, confusion, drooling and breathing difficulties. Therefore it is best to avoid water that may contain blue-green algae.

  • WATER INTOXICATION
    Water intoxication is fairly uncommon, however it is definite something to be aware of, if your dog spends lots of time swimming or playing in water. Symptoms of water intoxication include:
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Lethargy
    • Abdominal distention
    • Ataxia
    • Weakness
    • Coma
    • Seizures
    • Hypothermia
    • Bradycardia
    In a case, where you think your pet is suffering from water intoxication, please contact your vet immediately for advice.

  • FLYSTRIKE
    Our smaller pets such as rabbits and guinea pigs can be more at risk more quickly in the hotter temperatures. Flystrike is where flies lay eggs on the rabbit and the eggs will hatch into maggots. This condition can rapidly take effect within 24 hours and the maggots will eat into the living flesh if no action is taken. To reduce the chance of flystrike, check around their bottoms for fly eggs or maggots. This should be checked at least once a day. There are preventative treatments for Flystrike available – speak to a member of our staff for details.

  • BEE AND WASP STINGS
    The buzzing of a bee or wasp may not be a pleasant sound to us, however it may be intriguing for your pet, causing them to investigate and get stung. If your pet does get stung, please seek veterinary advice and treatment.

  • BARBEQUES
    During the nicer weather, everyone loves a BBQ, your pet included if they get some scraps! However this can be dangerous as some foods can substances toxic to our pets, such as grapes, onions, garlic and raisins. Bones and corncobs are also dangerous to our pets as if swallowed, they could be potential intestinal foreign bodies.

  • SAND
    Whilst digging, playing or repeatedly picking up sandy balls and toys, dogs often ingest sand. Sand can cause a blockage called sand impaction. Try to limit games of fetch on the beach, and make sure your pet has plenty of fresh water.

  • GARDEN PRODUCTS
    Ant powders, baits and gels contain chemicals which are highly toxic to dogs as well as weed killers and slug pellets. Always check the label, if the product states it is toxic to animals, opt for a pet-friendly insecticide/weed killer instead.

  • RAT POISON
    Rodenticide is used to prevent rats but is also toxic to pets, and can cause severe internal bleeding, vomiting, fits and changes in body temperature. Always opt for a pet-friendly product.

  • PLANTS AND FLOWERS
    There are many flowers and plants that are toxic to our pets, such as poppies, clematis, peony, foxglove, geranium, chrysanthemum, oleander and yew. If you are unsure whether your plants are safe, it is best to keep an close eye on your pet when they are in the garden and keep house plants out of reach.

  • GRASS SEEDS
    After walking your dog, it is a good idea to check their feet for any grass seeds. If these are left, they can track under the dog’s skin and causing swelling and lameness. They can also be found down dog’s ears so check around their ears also!

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Top tips for the warmer weather!

In this current warmer weather, our pets aren’t able to cope as well. Therefore as owners, we need to make sure they are safe, cool, healthy and happy.
  • HOT CARS
  • This is one of the biggest health concerns during the warmer months. Animals should never be left in a locked car when it’s hot outside. Even if the window is open, temperatures can increase to extreme levels very quickly. As a result, pets suffer from heatstroke.
  • PROTECTING YOUR PET’S SKIN
  • Animals can get sunburnt too just like us! If they will be exposed to the sunlight, apply sun cream to white and pink areas of their skin and importantly the tip of the ears. Animals with lighter coloured fur will be more prone.
  • FROZEN TREATS
  • Animals will love to have something cool, so why not pop your dog’s Kong in the freezer for a nice cool and refreshing treat. You can also use frozen water bottles wrapped in a towel and pop it in their bed for our cats and small furries

  • FLYSTRIKE
  • Our smaller pets such as rabbits and guinea pigs can be more at risk more quickly in the hotter temperatures. To reduce the chance of flystrike, check around their bottoms for fly eggs or maggots. This should be checked at least once a day. There are preventative treatments for Flystrike which last around 6 weeks depending on the product.
  • HAIRCUTS
  • Those pets with thick fur coats, why not book them in with the groomer to help them feel cooler during the warmer weather.
  • WALKING YOUR PETS
  • We advise to walk your dog during the cooler times of the day such as early morning or late evening. If it is still too hot to walk them, give them a rest of the evening. It is safer for them to not have a walk than to be at risk of heatstroke
  • WATCH OUT FOR GRASS SEEDS
  • After walking your dog, it is a good idea to check their feet for any grass seeds. If these are left, they can track under the dog’s skin and cause swelling and lameness. They can also be found in dog’s ears!
  • HEATSTROKE
  • Signs to look out for include collapse, rapid panting, excessive drooling and sticky gums. Provide your pet with plenty of fresh, clean drinking water and provide a shaded area. If you are worried that you pet is suffering from heatstroke, please seek veterinary advice immediately.
  • PROVIDING COOL AREAS
  • Prevent your pet from sitting in direct sunlight, provide a shaded area and move hutches and cages if necessary.
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Models Needed for 2019 Calendar

So this year, Milton Keynes Veterinary Group are eager to organise a charity calendar (charities are yet to be confirmed). Therefore we would like your best pet photo (must be excellent quality). We are aiming to get as many pets as possible on the calendar and we also need seasonal pictures:

  • Christmas
  • Halloween
  • Spring time
  • Easter
  • Valentines
Please send any photo’s you have and want to submit for consideration for the calendar to the address below:

mkvetgroup.photos@gmail.com

We look forward to seeing all your photos.

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A day in the life of a veterinary nurse

Firstly, it is imperative to point out that no two days at work are the same for a Veterinary Nurse. A day as an operating nurse at our Walnut Tree hospital starts early in the morning, when we come in and start the day with the most crucial job of all. Putting the kettle on! That being done we start to prepare the operating theatres where our patients will be undergoing surgical procedures that day, ensuring that everything is prepared and safe. The oxygen and nitrous oxide levels will be checked, specialist dental suit prepared and the laboratory machines tested. At this time our patients who will be staying with us for the day begin arriving, and we begin the admission process. This typically involves speaking with the owners, running through what will be happening during the day including any risks or concerns and then finally signing the consent form. We often spend time asking about your pets recent behaviour or any medical problems they have been experiencing, and trying our best to re-assure you that they are in safe hands.

cat-hosp

We will take your pet through to our prep room, take a weight for them and often take a blood sample for pre-operative blood tests or place an intravenous cannula. The blood sample will be run by our in-house machines (also operated by a registered veterinary nurse) and the results shown to a Veterinary Surgeon. Your pet will be settled and made comfortable in either our dedicated canine or feline ward whilst the Vet Nurse calculates and draws up the most suitable Pre-med that the vet has chosen. This usually consists of an anti-anxiety drug and a pain relief combined so that your pet is feeling calm whilst with us and the pain relief has time to work before anything begins. The surgery and prep area is then set up with appropriate anaesthetic equipment, which is all safety checked by our nurses. The nurse and vet who will be working together will discuss your pets specific case before they begin and then change into their surgical scrubs.

chance

The patient will then come through into the prep area where they are anaesthetised for surgery. The nurse will assist the vet by holding the patient, raising a vein if needed and keeping your pet calm and reassured through this experience. Once the anaesthetic begins the nurse is responsible for monitoring the vital signs which include: heart rate, pulse rate and quality, respiratory rate and effort, mucous membrane colour, capillary refill time, body temperature and depth of anaesthesia. This information is related to the veterinary surgeon throughout the surgery. The final stage or preparing the surgical patient is to clip and surgically prepare the skin surface. This involves using a special solution containing Chlorhexidine and a concentrated surgical spirit to ensure the area is sterile before surgery begins. The nurse will connect the patient to a specialised anaesthetic monitor in theatre which will display: an ECG of the patients heart, the level of oxygen in the blood, a graphical display of each breath the patient takes, how much oxygen they take in and how much carbon dioxide they breathe out. Combining this with the information the nurse can get from checking the patients vital signs (discussed above) is the safest way of monitoring anaesthesia.

bulldog-pup

Once the surgery is completed a nurse will recover that patient from anaesthesia, again monitoring all vital signs and alerting a Vet to any potential problems. The monitoring continues until they are back on their feet. Temperature, consciousness level, pulses, respiration and the condition of the wound are recorded and acted on. Once your pet is recovered a nurse will call you to arrange a time for them to come home. The surgical team will typically go through this multiple times in a day (cleaning the theatre between each patient), until all of the operations are completed. The surgical theatres are then thoroughly cleaned, the surgical instruments are cleaned and packaged ready to go through an auto-clave (for sterilisation) and the prep room cleaned down. When an owner arrives to collect their pet, a nurse will go through all of the post-operative care in detail. Any questions concerning the aftercare are answered and the patient is returned to the owner. Each day as a Veterinary Nurse is different, no two pets are the same and each one of our patients is treated as an individual.


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