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Posts Tagged ‘tips’

Preparing for Fireworks season: Tips on how to help your pet

Fireworks season can be a stressful time for many, with over 40% of dogs and high population of cats in the UK suffering from a fear of fireworks.

Here are some ideas to help your pets during this time:
  • Keep them indoors prior to when the fireworks are due to start.
  • Keep all doors and windows securely closed.
  • Make sure curtains are pulled closed to muffle the sound and block the light from the fireworks.
  • Keep internal doors open so they don’t feel enclosed.
  • Put the TV, radio or music on to provide background noise. It is advised to start this before the fireworks start.
  • Ensure your pet has a safe place to go when they feel distressed, this may be their own bed, or create a den.
  • Take your dog for a walk earlier in the day before the fireworks start and kept on the lead at all times.
  • Provide your cat with a litter tray if they are used to toileting outdoors.
  • Feed them their usual meal before the fireworks are due to start.
  • Ensure your pet is wearing an ID tag or microchip details are up to date in such case that they do run away or manage to escape.
  • Absolutely avoid any form of punishment. This will simple lead to more anxiety and even cause your pet to become aggressive.
  • Comforting you animal when they are scared is a controversial area. Definitely try to be at home during any known firework events. Although you shouldn’t pet or over fuss your animal when they are worried, as this can reinforce the fearful behaviour, it may help some pets to hold them firmly and lean into them, while using long, form massaging strokes, rather than normal petting.
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Tips on improving your senior cat’s appetite


Cats rely heavily on their ability to taste and smell food and these are both reduced in elderly cats. If your cat has a reduction in appetite it is always advised to get them checked with your vet, however sometimes it can be due to their decreased senses.




There are ways that you can encourage food intake at home, this includes the following:
  • Warming foods to 30˚c – A cat’s taste receptors are most receptive when food is at body temperature as this mimics the temperature of live prey.
  • Strong smelling foods such as fish can help encourage them to eat as a cats sense of smell may be reduced due to age.
  • Offering foods that you know they have enjoyed in the past as familiarity is important to cats.
  • Offer a different variety and consistency of foods. Often a cat that has always enjoyed biscuits may develop a preference for wet food due to dental disease causing pain. Adding water to the diet and mashing it up may encourage your cat to eat.
  • Shallow bowls that do not restrict your cat’s whisker movements are important. In the wild your cat would use their whiskers to wrap around their prey to help them bite in the appropriate location. Whiskers are also important to help cats locate food and objects that are close to their face.
  • It is also important to offer fresh, high protein diets. Cats possess taste receptors that are able to detect the amino acids produced by meat and this can help them to distinguish the nutritional quality and protein content of the food. Offering a variety of foods, including wet and dry as well as a variety of food shapes will give your cat the opportunity to choose their preference.
  • Offer food little and often, do not leave uneaten food down for long periods or lots of different food choices at once as this can be overwhelming for them. Place the food in a quiet, easily accessible part of the house.
  • Raise food bowls up on stands or boxes as this may provide more comfort for cats suffering with osteoarthritis affecting the neck.
  • Providing your cat with attention whilst they are eating can help increase appetite.
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Firework tips for our small pets

Our small pets can get stressed too during the fireworks season. Here are some signs to look out for and what we can do to help them!

Signs your small furry may be distressed:
  • Stamping their hind legs
  • Unwilling to move
  • Trying to escape from their accommodation
What can we do to help our small furries during this frightful time?
  • Ideally the best scenario during this season, is to bring their accommodation inside. However that isn’t always possible but moving them into your garage or shed will provide some soundproofing. If none of these are available then partly cover the hutch or cage with blankets.
  • If you have a house rabbit or you can move your pets inside, close the windows and draw the curtains.
  • Provide some background noise such as TV or radio. It is wise to start doing these before the fireworks season.
  • Within their accommodation, make sure there are hiding places your pet can utilise to make them feel safe with plenty of bedding. More bedding will also help minimise the noise.
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Top tips for the warmer weather!

In this current warmer weather, our pets aren’t able to cope as well. Therefore as owners, we need to make sure they are safe, cool, healthy and happy.
  • HOT CARS
  • This is one of the biggest health concerns during the warmer months. Animals should never be left in a locked car when it’s hot outside. Even if the window is open, temperatures can increase to extreme levels very quickly. As a result, pets suffer from heatstroke.
  • PROTECTING YOUR PET’S SKIN
  • Animals can get sunburnt too just like us! If they will be exposed to the sunlight, apply sun cream to white and pink areas of their skin and importantly the tip of the ears. Animals with lighter coloured fur will be more prone.
  • FROZEN TREATS
  • Animals will love to have something cool, so why not pop your dog’s Kong in the freezer for a nice cool and refreshing treat. You can also use frozen water bottles wrapped in a towel and pop it in their bed for our cats and small furries

  • FLYSTRIKE
  • Our smaller pets such as rabbits and guinea pigs can be more at risk more quickly in the hotter temperatures. To reduce the chance of flystrike, check around their bottoms for fly eggs or maggots. This should be checked at least once a day. There are preventative treatments for Flystrike which last around 6 weeks depending on the product.
  • HAIRCUTS
  • Those pets with thick fur coats, why not book them in with the groomer to help them feel cooler during the warmer weather.
  • WALKING YOUR PETS
  • We advise to walk your dog during the cooler times of the day such as early morning or late evening. If it is still too hot to walk them, give them a rest of the evening. It is safer for them to not have a walk than to be at risk of heatstroke
  • WATCH OUT FOR GRASS SEEDS
  • After walking your dog, it is a good idea to check their feet for any grass seeds. If these are left, they can track under the dog’s skin and cause swelling and lameness. They can also be found in dog’s ears!
  • HEATSTROKE
  • Signs to look out for include collapse, rapid panting, excessive drooling and sticky gums. Provide your pet with plenty of fresh, clean drinking water and provide a shaded area. If you are worried that you pet is suffering from heatstroke, please seek veterinary advice immediately.
  • PROVIDING COOL AREAS
  • Prevent your pet from sitting in direct sunlight, provide a shaded area and move hutches and cages if necessary.
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