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Keeping your pets safe at Easter – Plants

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
At Easter, flowers such as Daffodils may be in your house, these are poisonous to pets if they ingest them, as well as many other bulbs, plants and house plants. In the situation where your pet has ingested a plant, please contact your local vet and bring information rather the plant species if there is any. If there is no information what type of plant it is then bring along a photo of the plant or a piece of the plant to help identify it.

Signs of plant toxicity may include drooling, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, increased heart rate, abdominal pain, abnormal breathing or cardiac arrhythmias.
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Guidance regarding cats and coronavirus

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
On 8th April 2020, the BBC released a statement regarding keeping your cats indoors during lockdown. We would like to clarify that this statement from the British Veterinary Association (BVA) is not advising all cats to be kept indoors. Only cats that are living within households where individuals are infected with COVID-19 are being advised to stay inside, and then only if your feline friend is happy to do so – some cats may not be able to due to stress-related medical conditions.

The reason this is advised for cats living in households with infected individuals is that the virus could be on their fur in the same way it could be present on other surfaces. Therefore it is essential to maintain good hygiene when handling your pet at this time.

As per our previous statement regarding Coronavirus and our pets, the World Health Organisation of Animal Health (OIE) have advised that: “There is no evidence that dogs (or cats) can contract or spread infection of COVID-19.” Pet owners are at no more risk from their furry friends than they are inanimate objects such as a door handle. The best approach is still to stick to good hygiene, using soap and water to wash hands regularly throughout the day.

Read full BVA statement here – www.bva.co.uk/news-and-blog/news-article/bva-statement-on-cats-and-covid-19
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Keeping your pets safe at Easter – Roast Dinners

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Easter weekends may involve a roast dinner if you have managed to get roast dinner supplies at this current time. Bones given to our pets can be a risk to our pets causing intestinal blockage. In some cases the sharp edges of the bone may even pierce the intestine which may lead to peritonitis.

Cooked bones are particular fragile and therefore we would advised not to treat your pet with bones to prevent any potential obstruction.

Signs of an obstruction may include loss of appetite, vomiting, absence of faeces or diarrhoea, dehydration or abdominal discomfort.
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Keeping your pets safe at Easter – Hot Cross Buns

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Hot Cross Buns are another food item that you may have in your household at Easter. These delightful bready buns contain raisins, currants and sultanas which can be poisonous to our pets even in the smallest of quantities. Bear in mind to keep cakes and buns out of reach from your pets.

Signs of this toxicity may include vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy, anorexia, abdominal pain, increased thirst, change in urine frequency or dehydration.

In a situation that your pet eats a hot cross bun or similar item, please contact your veterinary practice.
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Keeping your pets safe at Easter – Chocolate

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
During the next few weeks there may be an abundance of chocolate in our households, pets eating chocolate has serious effects on their health. Make sure you keep your chocolate stash away from your pets and anyone else you don’t want getting their hands on it!

Chocolate contains a substance called theobromine which can be poisonous to our pets.

All types of chocolate whether it is white, milk or dark chocolate can contain Theobromine but at different quantities. In the situation, where you pet has managed to get hold of any chocolate, please contact your veterinary practice and it is always useful to have the chocolate packaging to show or discuss with your vet.

Signs of chocolate toxicity can include restlessness, vomiting, diarrhoea, increased thirst, elevated heart rate, increased blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythm, tremours or increased body temperature.
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