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Don’t overlook your pet’s broken tooth

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Fractured teeth are a common injury in cats and dogs, with the majority involving fractured canines of the upper jaw. Damage is commonly caused by falls, running into objects, clashing teeth and road traffic accidents. In dogs, other objects that can damage teeth include raw hide, bones, sticks/branches, rocks, ice and other hard objects.

The radiograph to the right shows a case of pulpitis in a cat. The pulp cavity is the hollow area inside a tooth filled with sensitive pulp tissue (blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue). This commonly occurs when the tip of the tooth is fractured, allowing bacteria to enter the pulp cavity. Swelling of the pulp tissue prevents blood entering the root canal and the result is ‘death’ of the tooth. On the radiograph we can see widening of the pulp cavity compared to the normal tooth on the right, with evidence of an abscess at the apex of the root. On this occasion the affected tooth was extracted.

It is important to note that this problem was found during a routine dental, and the patient did not show any obvious mouth pain at the time, but the owner reported marked improvement in his demeanour and appetite following surgery. Due to high pain threshold and other instinctive behaviours, our patients rarely shows signs of pain and will often hide pain very well.

It is therefore important to never ignore a broken tooth in your pet.
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MK Vet Group Guide to getting your pet used to a face mask

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
To animals, an owner wearing a face mask, can make them nervous. To help your pet feel more comfortable seeing you in a facemask follow our 4 easy steps:
  1. Start by showing your pet your face mask by simply holding it for them to sniff and investigate. Perform this step in a calm manner and rewarding them with a treat when they approach and sniff the face mask, this ensures positive enforcement towards the item.
  2. Next step is to wear the face mask in front of your pet, so put the mask on and keep it on for a short amount of time, starting from a few seconds and remove it again, gradually increasing the time frequently each time. Make sure you do not make any action that may scare your pet when you have the mask on. If they respond well to the mask being on, provide praise and a treat to your pet.
  3. Within your home, try walking into the room where your pet is, wearing a mask and again reward with a treat if they respond well. Repeat doing this in a sporadic approach and consider also returning home with your face mask on if you have popped out. Always make sure to reward positive behaviour.
  4. When your pet is comfortable with seeing you wearing a mask, you can try encounters with someone else wearing a mask out on a walk or a visitor to your home. Making sure to provide a treat for any positivity.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding your pet at this current time, please contact us on 01908 397777.
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Signs your pet may have Dental Disease

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Bad breath is the most common sign that your pet may have dental disease. Dental disease in pets is very common, however it is a disease that can be prevented.

Signs of dental disease can include:
  • Bad Breath
  • Pawing at mouth
  • Difficulty eating
  • Red or inflamed gums
  • Brown discoloured teeth
  • Facial swelling
  • Excessive drooling
  • Mobile teeth

If you are concerned you pet may be experiencing dental issues, please contact us.
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Do you know how many cat your cat has?

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Just like us, cat have non-permanent (deciduous) teeth to begin with which erupt around the age of 2-3 weeks.

Cats have 26 deciduous teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 10 Premolars
Permanent teeth begin to erupt from the age of 11-12 weeks.

Cats have 30 permanent teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 10 Premolars
  • 4 Molars
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Summer Dangers – Animals, Insects and Parasites

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
With your pet’s enjoying the outdoors, it is likely that they will come into to contact with various different animals, insects and parasites, it is important to bear in mind can cause an issue for your pets.
  • Slugs and snails – These slimy garden critters are involved in spread of Lungworm, therefore dogs that eat these slimy garden critters will be at a higher risk of contracting this parasite. It is though that an average UK garden can inhabit over 20,000 slugs and snails. It is highly recommended to not leave toys or water bowls outside to minimise exposure to these slimy critters. All dogs of all ages and breeds are susceptible to contracting this parasite. Dogs that become infected with Lungworm will also spread it within the environment as larvae are excreted within the pet’s faeces, increasing risk of exposure to other dogs. Therefore it is very important to make sure you pick up your dog’s poo.
  • Toads – Toads native in this country are the Common Toad and Natterjack Toad. They are mostly active within the spring and summer months of the year and this toxicity are mostly associated with pets licking one or trying to catch one. Symptoms can include foaming at the mount, vomiting, unsteady on their legs, high temperature, shaking and can lead to collapse if not treated promptly.
  • Adder bites – These snakes are the only poisonous type of snake in this country. Other non-poisonous snakes you may spot are smooth snakes or grass snakes. The adder is more distinctive by the brown zigzag marking on the body. If you pet is bitten the area affected will swell and this can spread in severe cases. They may also experience signs of pale gums, diarrhoea, dehydration, restlessness or lethargy. If not treated promptly they can experience blood clotting problems or lead to collapse.
  • Ticks – Ticks love areas of good vegetation so walking in these areas can mean more exposure to these pesky parasites. Ticks will bury their heads in our pets’ skin for a blood meal and sometimes spread disease in the process such as Lyme Disease and other diseases. Tick commonly are found in areas of a damp and warm environment such as wood or grasslands. They are a very adaptable parasite and can survive in different areas as long as they are close to hosts. Check your pet after walks for ticks which can commonly be found on body parts close to the ground such as paws, legs, belly. If you do find a tick, it can be removed with a tick removal otherwise one of our veterinary nurses would be happy to help.
  • Wasps/Bees – Wasps/Bees can be interesting creatures to our pets with the buzzing noise and their quick movements however they need to be careful not be be stung. Following a sting, our pets may show the following signs such as swelling, hives, pawing at their face or mouth, drooling, whining, lameness or licking or biting at the area of the sting. In some cases they may experience an allergic reaction, therefore please contact your vets immediately if they are struggling to breath, there is swelling around their mouth or throat or signs of collapse.

If you have any concerns regarding your pet if they are experiencing any symptoms, please contact us to provide further assistance.
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