• Free kitten treatment
  • aesthetic
  • aesthetic
  • Free kitten treatment
  • aesthetic
  • aesthetic

Still be prepared for Fireworks 2020 – Signs of Anxiety

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
As mentioned in our last post, this year is likely to be very different with respect to firework displays, with potentially an increase in smaller household displays.

Each individual pet will respond differently to fireworks, some may show just one or any combination of the following signs:
  • Shaking or trembling
  • Scratching at the door to get out of the room
  • Salivating
  • Hiding away
  • Vocalising – howling, barking, whining
  • Excessive or abnormal attention seeking
  • Loss of bodily control – urine/faeces
  • Unwillingness to eat
  • Hiding behind or on top of furniture
  • Refusing to eat
Visit our blog to find tips on helping your pet over this period
  • <

Still be prepared for Fireworks 2020 – MK Vet Group’s tips for this season

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
November 2020 is likely to be a very different Fireworks night. With a lack of larger public displays, we expect there will be a big increase in smaller home events. Therefore it is potentially even more important than ever to make sure you prepare your pet for this fireworks period.

We appreciate this time of year can be a stressful time for pets as well as their owners, with over 40% of dogs and a high population of cats in the UK suffering from a fear of fireworks.

Tips and ideas from MK Vet Group to help your pets during this time:
  • Keep your pet indoors prior to when the fireworks are expected to begin. Remember to secure the cat flap if you have one
  • Keep all doors and windows securely closed
  • Make sure curtains are also pulled to muffle sound and block the light from the fireworks
  • Keep internal doors open so your pets don’t feel enclosed or trapped
  • Turn on the TV, radio or play music as background noise, it is a good idea to have this on in advance to the fireworks beginning
  • Create a safe place for your pet to go when they feel stressed, this could be their bed or you can create a den
  • Walk your dog earlier in the day to avoid the times when fireworks are expected to be started, and keep them on their lead at all times
  • Make sure our small mammals are lock up in their hutches and cover their hutch over with a blanket to muffle noise
  • Provide your cat with a litter tray if they are used to toileting outside
  • Feed your pet their usual meal before the fireworks are expected to begin
  • Make sure that your pet is wearing a ID tag and that their microchip details are up to date in case they do manage to escape
  • It is important to avoid any form of punishment if your pet reacts to fireworks, this can lead to further anxiety
  • Comforting your pet when they are scared is an area of controversy. Definitely try to be at home on days around fireworks night when there is likely to be the highest number of displays. It is advised that you don’t pay too much attention or ‘fuss’ over your pet when they are worried, as this can reinforce the fearful behaviour. For some individuals, it may help to hold them firmly and lean into them, while using long, firm massaging strokes rather than normal petting
  • <

Our Willen Branch is Reopening TODAY!

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
From today, Monday 6th July, our Willen surgery will be open.

The guidelines remain the same. Our door will be locked and clients will be asked to wait outside. Telephone consultations, primary vaccination courses, rabbit vaccinations and annual boosters that were due in March and April can be carried out at our Willen surgery.

Please continue tp call and let us know when you are outside the surgery.

We thank you for your cooperation at this difficult time.

We are still here for you.
  • <

Myxomatosis and Viral Haemorrhagic Disease in rabbits

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Both these diseases are highly contagious within the rabbit population however are easily prevented.

Myxomatosis is a virus carried by biting insects and mosquitos and can be passed on without direct contact. The symptoms include puffy eyelids, conjunctivitis within the first 7 days and swelling will extend around the eyes, ears and genital regions after 7 days. In severe cases the rabbit may die from the virus.

Rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease (RVHD) is a highly infectious disease that can affect domestic and wild rabbits. RVHD 1, the classic RVHD, has been present in rabbits for decades and vaccinated against. A new strain of RVHD (RVHD2) was first noted in France in 2010. In the last couple of years, it has become an increasing concern regarding this new strain of RVHD in the UK with confirmed cases.

This new strain is less aggressive than RVHD 1 and symptoms may appear from 3 to 9 days post exposure. Symptoms can include high temperature, lethargy, sudden bleeding from areas (nose/mouth), reduced appetite and possible seizures. Even though this strain is less aggressive if not treated can cause death in severe cases

Myxomatosis and RVHD 1 can be prevented by vaccination and will provide the rabbit with 1 year immunity to the viruses.
  • <
mkvetgroup-facebook   mkvetgroup-instagram   mkvetgroup-google   mkvetgroup-youtube