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Posts Tagged ‘Cat’

Don’t overlook your pet’s broken tooth

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Fractured teeth are a common injury in cats and dogs, with the majority involving fractured canines of the upper jaw. Damage is commonly caused by falls, running into objects, clashing teeth and road traffic accidents. In dogs, other objects that can damage teeth include raw hide, bones, sticks/branches, rocks, ice and other hard objects.

The radiograph to the right shows a case of pulpitis in a cat. The pulp cavity is the hollow area inside a tooth filled with sensitive pulp tissue (blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue). This commonly occurs when the tip of the tooth is fractured, allowing bacteria to enter the pulp cavity. Swelling of the pulp tissue prevents blood entering the root canal and the result is ‘death’ of the tooth. On the radiograph we can see widening of the pulp cavity compared to the normal tooth on the right, with evidence of an abscess at the apex of the root. On this occasion the affected tooth was extracted.

It is important to note that this problem was found during a routine dental, and the patient did not show any obvious mouth pain at the time, but the owner reported marked improvement in his demeanour and appetite following surgery. Due to high pain threshold and other instinctive behaviours, our patients rarely shows signs of pain and will often hide pain very well.

It is therefore important to never ignore a broken tooth in your pet.
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Do you know how many cat your cat has?

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Just like us, cat have non-permanent (deciduous) teeth to begin with which erupt around the age of 2-3 weeks.

Cats have 26 deciduous teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 10 Premolars
Permanent teeth begin to erupt from the age of 11-12 weeks.

Cats have 30 permanent teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 10 Premolars
  • 4 Molars
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Summer Dangers – Pavements, Roads and Cars

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
It is extremely important, to never leave your pet alone in your car on a hot summer’s day even if the windows are left slightly open or parked in the shade. The temperature in a car can rise dramatically on a warm day, even when it doesn’t feel that warm outside.

Dogs left in a car on a hot summer’s day can become extremely distressed and an experience heatstroke as a result. Symptoms can include:
  • Excessive drooling and thirst
  • Lethargy
  • Dark pigmentation to tongue
  • Heavy panting
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Lack of coordination
Heatstroke can be a difficult condition to treat, however need their body temperature lowering gradually, if you think your pet is experiencing signs of heatstroke, move them to a shaded area, provide a cool (NOT COLD) wet towel and place in a breeze of a fan. Please contact you vets immediately to obtain further advice and to be seen at the practice.

As well as cars, pavements and roads can become extremely hot on a warm summer’s day. Studies have shown pavements and roads can reach temperatures of 52oC on warm days, which is enough to severely burn your dog’s paws. As a test, place the back of your hand on the surface for seven seconds – if this is too hot for you, then it is too hot for your pet! Make sure to walk them at the cooler times of day either early morning and late evening to avoid this.
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Minimising Stress Post Lockdown

  • Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
    Many pets and their owners have had their normal routine disrupted over the past few months. As you find yourself returning to work after several weeks at home, you may find your pet starts to show signs of separation anxiety and potentially adverse behaviour patterns. As a veterinary practice, we expect there may be a rise in behavioural issues in pets, with separation anxiety being the number one contributing factor.

    Unfortunately for behavioural problems, there is no quick solution but you can help by using a combination of:
    • Training Programmes
    • Environmental enrichment
    • Pheromones
    • Pharmaceuticals
    Training and the environment are especially important in resolving behavioural issues, particularly for separation anxiety. If over the last few months you have spent more time at home than normal, your pet will have become accustomed to this extra time with you.

    Here are a few ideas to help your pet when you leave the house in preparation to when you may return to normal routine:
    • Increase the time you are spending away from your pet gradually
    • When you leave the house give your pet a safe toy to keep them distracted
    • When you return home, make sure you greet your pet in a calm manner
    • Leave clothes that you have recently worn as a comfort for your pet
    • Make sure your pet still gets regular exercise and play time
    • Create a safe place for them to reside when you are not at home
    What are pheromone replacements?

    Pheromone replacements for dogs are a synthetic replication of the dog appeasing pheromone that is naturally released by the dog’s mother to provide comfort and reassurance. There are also pheromone replacements for cats which is a synthetic replication of the feline facial pheromone when they rub their face on people, furniture, doorways and other objects.

    We have different pheromone products available at Milton Keynes Veterinary Group, please contact us if you would like advice and which may be suitable for your pet. These remedies are available over the counter.

    Through a combination of both behavioural training and pheromone replacements you can help your pet adapt to their new normal.
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