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Posts Tagged ‘disease’

Alabama Rot – Update February 2020

Cases of Alabama Rot are still being reported in the UK, with Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists providing an update of a further 12 cases within 2020, totaling 2016 confirmed cases since 2012.

This disease is still very rare within the UK, and we advise dog owners to seek advice from their local vet if their dog develops unexplained skin lesions. Within a twenty mile radius of Milton Keynes, there has only been one confirmed case since 2014. If you are traveling with your dogs, areas of higher case records include South of England and North West of England areas.
What is Alabama Rot?

Alabama rot is a disease which damages blood vessels within the kidney and skin. The disease causes blood clots to form in the vessels, damaging their lining and delicate tissues within the kidneys, and sadly can lead to kidney failure which can be fatal. It can also cause ulceration on the dog’s tongue. Alabama rot is also known as Cutaneous and Renal Glomerular Vasculopathy (CRGV), and was first detected by in the 1980s in the USA.


What causes Alabama Rot?

Unfortunately the disease can affect any dog of any breed, age or size, and the majority of cases have recently been walked in muddy or woodland areas.

There seems to be more cases reported during the months November to May than there is between the months of June to October, therefore winter and spring time is more dangerous to your dog.


What are the symptoms?

Most commonly, the skin lesions are seen below the knee or elbow, and are a symptom of the disease rather than being a wound from injury. There may be a patch of red skin or an ulcerated area, and there may be swelling around the lesion. In the following two to seven days, the affected dogs have developed signs of kidney failure, including vomiting, lethargy and reduced appetite. This disease will not be the only cause of skin lesions or kidney failure, often there will be another cause.

However, prompt diagnosis and treatment is imperative for any dog with Alabama Rot, but without knowing what causes the disease, it is also difficult for us to be able to give you specific advice on prevention or where to walk your dog.


How to prevent Alabama Rot?

We advise checking your dog over for skin lesions regularly and monitor for any signs as mentioned above. We also suggest bathing your dogs after their walks to remove any mud. Alabama rot is unfortunately not a disease we can vaccinate against at present, and it is not thought to affect cats or rabbits.

We will update this blog if any new information becomes available for this disease.


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Vaccinations included with our Healthly Pet Care Scheme

Our Healthy Pet Care Scheme is a great way to spread the cost of your pet’s care and enabling you to keep up to date with all their vaccinations as well as flea and worming treatments.

What diseases are covered by vaccinations included in our Healthy Pet Care Scheme?

Dogs
  • Canine Parvovirus – This disease is caused by Canine Parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and is spread through the environment or dog to dog contact. This virus is highly contagious in all unvaccinated animals. Symptoms of this disease may include gastrointestinal signs, anaemia, shock and dehydration.
  • Canine Distemper – This disease is caused by Canine Distemper virus, and is spread by direct contact with affected dogs. Symptoms may include nasal discharge, sneezing, difficulty breathing and coughing.
  • Infectious Canine Hepatitis – This disease is caused by the virus Canine Adenovirus Type 1 (CAV-1), and usually spread via contact with in the environment rather than dog to dog contact. Symptoms may include lethargy, high temperature, gastrointestinal signs, jaundice and painful abdomen.
  • Leptospirosis – This disease is caused by the bacteria Leptospira. It can be spread by direct contact with infected urine or contaminated water. Symptoms may include fever, gastrointestinal signs, jaundice, dark urine and dehydration.
  • Kennel Cough – is a commonly seen upper respiratory tract infection in dogs. The most common bacterium that causes Kennel Cough is Bordetella bronchiseptica however another pathogen is called parainfluenza.
Cats
  • Feline Panleukopenia (Feline Infectious Enteritis) – This disease is caused by Parvovirus and is highly contagious. It can be spread easily from cat to cat and excreted in faeces and bodily fluids. Symptoms can include gastrointestinal signs, fever, loss of appetite, depression and anaemia.
  • Cat Flu – Feline Herpesvirus and Feline Calicivirus are the two main causes of ‘cat flu’. It spreads through air droplets caused when infected cats sneeze, or via nasal and ocular discharge. It can also be spread through direct contact with an infected cat or via a person’s clothing. Symptoms may include fever, lack of appetite, lethargy, discharge from eyes and nose, sneezing and mouth ulcers.
  • Feline Leukaemia– This virus is found worldwide, and is spread through mutual grooming and bite wounds as it is contained in body fluids. Symptoms can include fever, lethargy, poor coat condition, weight loss, anaemia and gastrointestinal signs.
Rabbits
  • Myxomatosis – is a virus carried by biting insects and mosquitos and can be passed on without direct contact. The symptoms include puffy eyelids, conjunctivitis within the first 7 days and swelling will extend around the eyes, ears and genital regions after 7 days.In severe cases the rabbit may die from the virus.
  • Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease Strains 1 and 2 – Rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease (RVHD) is a highly infectious disease that can affect domestic and wild rabbits. RVHD 1, the classic RVHD, has been present in rabbits for decades and vaccinated again. A new strain of RVHD (RVHD2) was first noted in France in 2010. In the last 12 months, it has become an increasing concern regarding this new strain of RVHD in the UK with confirmed cases. This new strain is less aggressive than RVHD 1 and symptoms may appear from 3 to 9 days post exposure. Symptoms can include high temperature, lethargy, sudden bleeding from areas (nose/mouth), reduced appetite and possible seizures. Even though this strain is less aggressive if not treated can cause death in severe cases.
Find out more about our Healthy Pet Care Scheme – http://www.mkvetgroup.co.uk/healthy-pet-care/.
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Canine Parvovirus

This can be a potentially fatal illness in dogs and more cases are arising on a day by day basis. Over the years, we have seen many parvovirus cases at the practice as well as other areas of the UK. The disease is extremely contagious and can affect dogs of all breeds and ages.

The virus can be spread from dog to dog through direct contact, faecal excretion or via the environment. Affected animals that are recovering may still spread for up to eight weeks and once in the environment, it is highly resistant and may remain there for many months.

Unfortunately, there is no cure for Canine Parvovirus and on diagnosis, most cases will be provided supportive treatment such as fluid therapy and nutritional support. However this disease is preventable through vaccination.

We feel it is important for more owners to be aware of this disease and it’s severity, as well as the potential symptoms in order to detect the disease sooner rather than later.

Symptoms of Parvovirus can include the following:
  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea often with blood
  • If left untreated, their condition may deteriorate rapidly
If you have any further questions regarding this disease, please don’t hesitate to contact the practice on 01908 397777.
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Important news about Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease

As you know we currently recommend vaccination for rabbits against Myxomatosis and VHD-1 (viral haemorrhagic disease). There has been a lot of concern in the rabbit press about a new strain of VHD (VHD-2) which the current vaccination does not protect against and causes sudden death in rabbits. There is a vaccine available for commercial rabbits on the continent and we are able to import a small supply for our pets but it does not have a UK licence. It can be given from 6 weeks of age but should not be given at the same time as the routine vaccines. It needs to be repeated every 6 months to maintain protection. As the vaccine comes in a multidose vial which has to be discarded 2 hours after opening we are hoping to group appointments together for those rabbit clients who wish their pets to have this vaccine so as to minimise waste and vaccinate as many rabbits as possible for a reasonable price. The cost of the vaccine is £25 (including VAT) If you are interested in having this vaccine please contact us on 01908 397777 so we can add you to our list. Once we receive our stock we will contact you to book into one of our sessions and arrange payment. It is very important only to book a slot when you are definitely available as otherwise your dose will have to be discarded. Please remember that VHD-2 is not yet common in the UK, and so the risk to your rabbit remains minimal. Myxomatosis still remains the biggest risk to pet rabbits in the UK. Please ensure your rabbits have been vaccinated against Myxomatosis disease in the past 12 months. Further, and regularly updated information can be found on the Rabbit Welfare Association & Fund website blog here: http://rabbitwelfare.blogspot.co.uk/

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