• Free kitten treatment
  • aesthetic
  • aesthetic
  • Free kitten treatment
  • aesthetic
  • aesthetic

Posts Tagged ‘teeth’

Dental disease in Rabbits

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Rabbits can also suffer from dental disease, in most cases normally occurring in later life. Dental disease in rabbits can present in a number of ways, such as abscesses, malocclusion and tooth root conformation. Malocclusion may occur due to a tooth root abnormality or missing opposing tooth.

Overgrown teeth in older rabbits is common and can penetrate the gums, cheeks, tongue and lips, which can cause ulcers or even oral abscesses. Rabbit’s teeth are continuously growing around 2-3mm a week. Therefore it is best to keep the diet as natural as possible to grind down their cheek teeth effectively.

If your rabbit is not eating properly or losing weight, we recommend they are checked for abnormal dentition, contact us on 01908 397777.

  • <

How to keep your dog’s teeth healthy

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Dental health is not only important in humans but for your pets too! Here are some tips to keeping your dog’s teeth healthy:
  1. Provide your dog with a daily dental routine. It is best for start from a puppy. Tooth brushing is the single most effective method however other methods can also be combined. Pick a suitable time in your routine and keep as your usual time.
  2. If your pet is older, you should still begin daily dental care, however it is best to have a dental check prior to beginning to make sure there are no issues.
  3. Make sure your pet has an oral examination every year at their annual check-up.
  4. Provide chews and toys that are recommended and are safe for your pet. Avoid abrasive objects such as bones, hard nylon chew toys or tennis balls as these often cause damage to teeth and gums.
  5. Feed a diet formulated to reduce dental plaque and keep teeth healthy.
  6. Dental chews can be used to reduce plaque and tartar build up however these should be accounted for within their day’s diet to prevent obesity.
  7. Keep the session short from a few seconds to a couple of minutes.
  8. Repeat each stage daily then move onto the next stage when you dog is comfortable.
  9. Train at a pace that suits for dog.
  10. Give lots of praise and reward for GOOD behaviour.
  • <

Do you know how many cat your cat has?

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Just like us, cat have non-permanent (deciduous) teeth to begin with which erupt around the age of 2-3 weeks.

Cats have 26 deciduous teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 10 Premolars
Permanent teeth begin to erupt from the age of 11-12 weeks.

Cats have 30 permanent teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 10 Premolars
  • 4 Molars
  • <

Do you know how many teeth your dog has?

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Just like us, dogs have non-permanent (deciduous) teeth to begin with which erupt around the age of 3-4 weeks.

Dogs have 28 deciduous teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 12 Premolars
Permanent teeth begin to erupt from the age of 12 weeks.

Dogs have 42 permanent teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 16 Premolars
  • 10 Molar
  • <

Looking after your rabbit and their teeth

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
One of the most common reasons your rabbit may need to see a vet is due to dental problems. Rabbit’s teeth grow continuously so they need to grind them down through their diet by eating lots of hay and grass. This is one of the important reasons why a rabbit’s diet needs to be correct. If a rabbit’s teeth become too long then they often become sharp and start to dig in to their gums causing pain. Rabbits will then stop eating due to this pain, and if a rabbit isn’t eating it can be life threatening.

It is important to monitor your rabbit to make sure they are not experiencing a decreased appetite or passing smaller faeces, and there are no signs of lethargy or drooling. If your rabbit has these signs, then please contact the practice for advice.
  • <
mkvetgroup-facebook   mkvetgroup-instagram   mkvetgroup-google   mkvetgroup-youtube