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Posts Tagged ‘toxin’

Keeping your pets safe at Easter – Plants

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
At Easter, flowers such as Daffodils may be in your house, these are poisonous to pets if they ingest them, as well as many other bulbs, plants and house plants. In the situation where your pet has ingested a plant, please contact your local vet and bring information rather the plant species if there is any. If there is no information what type of plant it is then bring along a photo of the plant or a piece of the plant to help identify it.

Signs of plant toxicity may include drooling, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, increased heart rate, abdominal pain, abnormal breathing or cardiac arrhythmias.
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Keeping your pets safe at Easter – Hot Cross Buns

Milton Keynes Veterinary Group
Hot Cross Buns are another food item that you may have in your household at Easter. These delightful bready buns contain raisins, currants and sultanas which can be poisonous to our pets even in the smallest of quantities. Bear in mind to keep cakes and buns out of reach from your pets.

Signs of this toxicity may include vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy, anorexia, abdominal pain, increased thirst, change in urine frequency or dehydration.

In a situation that your pet eats a hot cross bun or similar item, please contact your veterinary practice.
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Tis the Season to be Jolly but beware of the dangers!

This Christmas, our team at Milton Keynes Veterinary Group, want you and your pet to enjoy the festive season, however it is always good to make sure the house is pet proof!

The majority of vets during this time of year will treat a number of pets for eating items that are toxic for them. With chocolate remaining top of the list of ingested ingredients.

Cats have also been reported to be seen over this time also for cases of antifreeze poisoning and seasonal plant poisoning such as poinsettia, lilies and mistletoe.

It is also a good idea to be careful of festive decorations around our houses like tinsel and fairy lights as these can be hazards to both our cats and dogs.

Some ideas for a hazard-free Christmas with your pets:
  • Must sure your pet does not have access to those festive decorations without your supervision – these items can be very appealing to our pets but can cause seriously harm is broken, chewed or swallowed.
  • Give your pet toys not treats – too many of those yummy treats your pet enjoys will lead to obesity which can have detrimental effects on their health so why not consider a new toy to keep them active and in shape.
  • Poison protection – make sure those festive treats are out of reach that can contain ingredients that are harmful to our pets including chocolate, sweets, raisins, xylitol, nuts, grapes or liquorice. As well as festive decorations and seasonal plants as poinsettia, holly and mistletoe.
  • Make sure you know where your local veterinary is over this time. Sometimes accidents and emergencies may still occur, therefore be aware of your vet’s emergency cover provision and opening hours.
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The 12 dangers of Christmas

Christmas can be a very chaotic time of year and a more dangerous time for our pets as their usual home surroundings are filled with presents, decorations, trees and much more. We want to make you aware of potential toxins over the Christmas period in order for you to sit back, relax and celebrate this time of year.

Chocolate: In chocolate there is a substance called Theobromine which is poisonous to our pets. It can be found in all types of chocolate – white, milk and dark.
Onions: All of the onion family, including leeks, garlics, chives and shallots whether they are cooked, dried or raw can be poisonous to dogs.
Christmas Cake and Mince Pies: Raisins, currents and sultanas, as well as grapes, are common ingredients and can be poisonous. Please take care in order to keep cakes and snacks away from your pet.
Blue Cheese: This cheese contains roquefortine C which animals are very sensitive to. Therefore is best to keep out of reach and dispose of any leftovers.
Bones: It is common for small, cooked bones (especially from poultry) to fragment easily into pieces with very sharp edges when chewed.
Artificial Sweetners: Xylitol can be found in chewing gums, mints, sweets and liquorice.
Alcohol: Most people are aware not to give alcoholic drinks to their pets, however alcohol poisoning in pets can be more common than you think!
Mould: Growth on food, in rubbish bins and sacks can hold toxins which will quickly attack an animal’s nervous system. Only a small amount of these mycotoxins can cause tremors and seizures.
Poinsettia, Holly, Mistletoe, Ivy, Lillies: Many flowers, house plants and bulbs that can be poisonous to our pets. We often bring seasonal plants inside the house or receive them as gifts.
Christmas Trees: If eaten it may cause mild stomach upset however the sharp tips may do more damage internally.
Christmas Decorations & Wrapping Paper: There is a high risk of gastrointestinal obstruction if the decoration is ingested.
Silica Gel: This may be found in a present in small sachets containing silica gel
In the case, where your pet ingests any of the items above, it is best to contact the vet for advice. If you need to take your pet to the vet, please take any relevant packaging in order treat your pet.
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Blue Green Algae – Willen Lake, Caldecotte Lakes and Emberton Park

Following water safety checks at Willen Lake, Caldecotte Lakes and Emberton Park in July 2019, a potentially toxic bloom of blue-green algae has been reported to the Environment Agency. 

As a precautionary measure, notices are being posted at the lake warning that contact with the algal scum should be avoided. 

What are blue-green algae?  Blue-green algae naturally occur in inland waters and blooms can form when their numbers become excessive. It is these ‘blooms’ that give the water a blue-green appearance or a ‘pea soup’ like colour. The behaviour of these algae is erratic and the level of its toxicity can fluctuate; it can appear one day, be dispersed by the wind and, mix and re-accumulate at any time. 

How can blue-green algae affect you and your animals? Blue-green algal blooms can produce toxins hazardous to both people and animals. Not all blue-green blooms produce toxins, but it is not possible to tell which are dangerous without testing, and therefore all blooms should be considered potentially toxic. Dogs that enjoy swimming and playing in lakes and ponds may be exposed to blue-green algae. 

Symptoms of poisoning include: Vomiting, Diarrhoea, Blood in stool or black tarry stool, Pale mucous membranes, Jaundice, Seizures, Disorientation, Coma, Shock Excessive secretions (e.g., salivation, lacrimation, etc.), Neurologic signs (including muscle tremors, muscle rigidity, paralysis, etc.), Blue discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes, Difficulty breathing.

Aggressive, immediate treatment is necessary to help treat this quick-acting, potentially fatal poison. If there are any signs of illness in your animal after contact with the water, contact us immediately on 01908 397777. 
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