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Archive for August, 2019

How many teeth does your dog have?

Just like us, dogs have non-permanent (deciduous) teeth to begin with which erupt around the age of 3-4 weeks.

Dogs have 28 deciduous teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 12 Premolars
Permanent teeth begin to erupt from the age of 12 weeks.

Dogs have 42 permanent teeth consisting of:
  • 12 Incisors
  • 4 Canines
  • 16 Premolars
  • 10 Molar
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Does your pet have bad breath?

This could be a sign of dental disease. Dental disease in pets is very common, however it is a disease that can be prevented.

We are focusing on Dental Disease and Prevention during the month of September.

Signs of dental disease can include:
  • Bad Breath
  • Pawing at mouth
  • Difficulty eating
  • Red or inflamed gums
  • Brown discoloured teeth
  • Facial swelling
  • Excessive drooling
  • Mobile teeth
We are offering a FREE DENTAL CHECK* for your cat or dog with one of our Registered Veterinary Nurses who will examine your pet’s teeth and discuss about prevention of dental disease. Appointments are available at our Walnut Tree Hospital, Stoke Road Surgery and Willen Surgery.

Our practice has dental facilities at our Walnut Tree Hospital and Stoke Road Surgery including dental radiography. Dental x-rays allow us to detect hidden disease within the teeth and below the gum line to ensure your pet gets the maximum benefit from their procedure.

* If your pet is found to be ill during the free dental check, treatment costs will be incurred. Dental treatment will be chargeable.
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Heatstroke – recognising the signs

Signs of heatstroke may vary from different animals, however these are the main symptoms to look out for: –

  • Faster, heavier panting
  • Signs of agitation
  • Excessive thirst
  • Excessive drooling
  • Increased pulse / heartbeat
  • Elevated body temperature
  • Weakness or collapse
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

What to do if you think your pet is suffering from heatstroke?

If your dog is suffering from heat stroke, they need to have their body temperature lowered gradually.
  • Move your pet to a shaded/cool area
  • Provide your pet with fresh, cool water in small quantities
  • Contact your vet immediately for advice
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Heatstroke – Rabbits

Heat stroke is not something just seen in dogs and cats, rabbits can also suffer from heat stroke. The ideal environmental temperature for a rabbit’s enclosure is between 10 and 20 degrees Celsius. Rabbits are unable to cope well with sudden changes of temperature and can start showing signs of heatstroke even at 22 degrees Celsius.

Recognising signs of heatstroke in rabbits is very important, these may include lethargy, panting, salivating, weakness, reddening of the ears. Disorientation, seizures and can in some cases be fatal. Warmer weather can also mean a higher risk of flystrike, therefore it is also important to check your rabbit’s bottom and make sure the hutch is cleaned regularly.





Some ideas to help keep your rabbits cooler in the higher temperatures can include
  • Wiping water onto their ears
  • Place a damp towel over the enclosure
  • Provide plenty of cold water
  • Freeze bottles of water or ice parks
  • Allow them access to an area of stone or ceramic tiles to lie on
  • Create plenty of shade for them
  • You can even purchase specialist cage fans to keep them cool
If you are concerned your rabbit is experiencing signs of heat stroke, please contact your vet immediately.
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Grass seeds and your pets

During this time of year, grass seeds are commonly seen in the veterinary industry. These seeds will fall off and embed themselves in a pet’s paw, ears, armpit, nose or skin and can travel under the skin to other parts of the body.

The signs or symptoms will depend on which body part is affected which can be noted below.
  • Grass seed in a pet’s ear
    • Head shaking
    • Reddening to the ear
    • Painful to touch
    • Head tilt
    • Loss of balance
  • Grass seed in pet’s paw
    • Reddening of skin around area
    • Swelling of foot or between toes
    • Limping
    • Licking at affected area
  • Grass seeds in pet’s eyes
    • Increased tear production
    • Rubbing or pawing at the eye
    • Swelling or redness
  • Grass seeds in pet’s nose
    • Repeated sneezing
    • Discharge from the nostril
    • Rubbing face on surfaces
    • Breathing difficulties
  • Grass seeds under skin
    • Licking at site
    • Grass seed visible out of surface of skin
    • Swollen, red lump
Grass seeds can be prevented by keeping your lawn tidy, checking your dog over after a walk to remove any grass seeds in these most common areas. If your pet is experiencing any of these signs, please contact your vet for an examination as the main concern is they can migrate within your pet’s body.
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